"be finished with" vs "finish"

English translation: practically speaking, the meaning is almost the same, but...

03:45 Apr 12, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: "be finished with" vs "finish"
What are the differences between "be finished with" and "finish"?

For example, What's the difference of the meaning of the following two sentences?
1) I'm finished with my report
2) I've finished my report
Elearner
English translation:practically speaking, the meaning is almost the same, but...
Explanation:
there is a slight difference of perspective.

In #1, the emphasis is on relief at having gotten through the work.

In #2, the emphasis is on having completed a process.
This may be a little more positive, as it implies pride taken in the work.


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Note added at 5 mins (2005-04-12 03:50:58 GMT)
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Also, #1 is a little more colloquial than #2.
Selected response from:

Refugio
Local time: 05:23
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +14practically speaking, the meaning is almost the same, but...
Refugio
5see (similar to "I'm done with" vs. " I've completed...")
Carmen Schultz
3from a UK viewpoint
Charlie Bavington (X)


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +14
finished v. finished with
practically speaking, the meaning is almost the same, but...


Explanation:
there is a slight difference of perspective.

In #1, the emphasis is on relief at having gotten through the work.

In #2, the emphasis is on having completed a process.
This may be a little more positive, as it implies pride taken in the work.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2005-04-12 03:50:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also, #1 is a little more colloquial than #2.

Refugio
Local time: 05:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martin Perazzo: Also, #1 can have negative connotations in the sense of ending something negative (a relationship, a boyfriend, etc.) or being fed up with something or someone.
7 mins
  -> Exactly; thanks, Martin

agree  GoodWords: "1 can also convey the meaning that the speaker will not work on the report any longer, whether it is finished or not.
13 mins
  -> Good point, GoodWords; thanks

agree  sarahl (X): yes #1 implies, don't you ever mention it again. :-)
13 mins
  -> Thanks, Sarah

agree  Can Altinbay: And frankly, I'm finished with this question :)
55 mins
  -> Thanks, Can. Frankly?

agree  humbird: With pride ....... yes passive sentence always dilutes the sense of accomplishment.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, humbird

agree  Mikhail Kropotov: with everyone
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Sir

agree  Enza Longo
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, enzalo

agree  Maria Karra
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Maria

agree  Charlie Bavington (X): Interesting (to me) difference in US and UK usage, it would appear (see my answer) (I'm not sure I'm qualified to "agree" from a US viewpoint, but I wanted to make the point & a neutral/disagree seemed unduly harsh)// Disagree? I said - I can't judge :-)
4 hrs
  -> Please feel free to disagree if that is your inclination. I promise not to whine about it.

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Vicky

agree  NancyLynn: I'm finished with it could also mean 'my part in this is done' even though the report may need additional work from others in order to be completed.
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nancy

agree  Rania KH: Excellent answer; and very nice comments
10 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rania

agree  rangepost
14 hrs
  -> Thanks, rangepost

agree  Robert Donahue (X)
1 day 15 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rob
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
be finished with" vs "finish"
see (similar to "I'm done with" vs. " I've completed...")


Explanation:
1) example I'm finished with my report is similar in thought
process to:

1b) I'm done with my report

2) I've finished my report is similar in thought process to:

2b) I've completed my report

The main thing that can be said is that examples 1 and 1b are more chatty that 2 and 2b.

Carmen Schultz
Local time: 07:23
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
from a UK viewpoint


Explanation:
The two are different in the UK.

"to finish with" = "stop using", rougly. Often used in a question - have you finished with the phone? (so I can make a call) or other context that means another person can use the same thing immediately afterwards - I've finished with the bathroom (so you can take a shower now).

"finish" over here in UK has its standard dictionary definitions - complete, etc.

Interestingly, then, there is a slight difference of meaning when it comes to reading material - books, reports etc.

I've finished my report could mean either I've finished writing it OR I've finished reading it.

I've finished with my report would not (usually) mean I've finished writing it. It could mean I've finished reading it (and so you can read it now if you like), or I've finished using it for some other purpose - like propping the door open, say :-) (and now you can use it)

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Note added at 4 hrs 51 mins (2005-04-12 08:37:46 GMT)
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The point is taken that the Asker is likely to be in the USA, given the time of posting, just wanted to make the point, in case anyone was interested :-)

Charlie Bavington (X)
Local time: 13:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Refugio: Look again: the question is about "I'm finished with," not "I've finished with."
6 mins
  -> True enough. But if I didn't really notice that, it's becos here the two are equivalent, certainly in the case of "finished with". The difference is one of regional usage only. Hence I read them as =.
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