KudoZ home » English » General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters

suitably

English translation: to give a suitable answer to

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:suitably
English translation:to give a suitable answer to
Entered by: Cristina Mazzucchelli
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

13:49 May 24, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: suitably
I think I have a doubt about the positionof the adverb in this sentence:

"We are ready to suitably answer your questions in terms of functionality, experience and flexibility."

I would put "suitably" after the verb. What do you think?

TIA
Cristina Mazzucchelli
Italy
Local time: 13:38
to give a suitable answer to
Explanation:
If you do not believe in split infinitives, go for alternative constructions, such as the above.
Selected response from:

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:38
Grading comment
I wanted to split the points also...:-) But your solution sounded really nice! Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +8to give a suitable answer to
Nick Lingris
3 +6'split infinitive'
Tony M
5 +1... possible, but not good style ...
Craig Meulen
2 +2leave it off completely
Derek Gill Franßen


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
leave it off completely


Explanation:
As far as its position is concerned, I think it would work either before or after the verb (or even after "questions", which would then make the most sense to me), but in reading this sentence I had ask myself what the word "suitably" is supposed to mean - I still don't know (hence my suggestion to leave it off). ;-)

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 13:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: I think the meaning is far from clear too
1 min

agree  Mikhail Kropotov
43 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
to give a suitable answer to


Explanation:
If you do not believe in split infinitives, go for alternative constructions, such as the above.

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
I wanted to split the points also...:-) But your solution sounded really nice! Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
0 min
  -> Thank you, Dusty. I owe you one.

agree  xxxcmwilliams
4 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Derek Gill Franßen: This construction certainly makes more sense to me. ;-)
16 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Mikhail Kropotov
42 mins
  -> Thank you, Mikhail.

agree  David Moore: Far better option
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, David. But then I see Dusty's lengthy explanation and hit myself on the head for being so laconic.

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Marju.

agree  conejo
6 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  rangepost
9 hrs
  -> Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
'split infinitive'


Explanation:
What you have here is the classic example of a 'split infinitive', once deeply frowned upon, but nowadays increasingly acceptable.

However, in the sentence as it stands, it does read rather uncomfortably, but it is difficult to know where else you could position the adverb to make it any better.

For me, the real problem in the first place is the choice of this adverb; you can answer quickly / curtly / politely, but it sounds all wrong to say 'answer suitably' --- it isn't appropriate as a manner in which to answer.

I would prefer something like 'We are ready to come up with suitable answers to your questions concerning...'

It's not even quite clear what you are trying to say; do you mean that the 'we' are the ones who have the experience / fnctionality etc.? You really need to explain a bit more clearly what you're really trying to say, and then I could perhaps help you better...

Tony M
France
Local time: 13:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 285

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxcmwilliams
5 mins
  -> Thanks, CMW!

agree  Nick Lingris: I actually owe you two agrees for the beautiful explanation.
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Nick! How kind...

agree  Mikhail Kropotov
42 mins
  -> Spasibo, Mikhail ! :-)

agree  Can Altinbay: Nice alternative. The original construction is awkward beyond the split infinitive. And what did Capt. Picard say? "...to boldly split infinitives where no one has split them before"?
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Can! Capt. Picard?! Who's that young upstart...? Give me Admiral Kirk anytime :-)

agree  David Moore
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, David!

agree  Sonia Geerlings
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Sonia!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
... possible, but not good style ...


Explanation:
It's possible how you wrote it, but it's not good style to "split the infinitive"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2005-05-24 13:57:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In fact, I would re-write it like this:

We are ready to provide a suitable answer ..

Craig Meulen
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mikhail Kropotov
46 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search