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Strick

English translation: typo for strict?

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20:58 Oct 30, 2006
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: Strick
I know the literal translation meanse noose, but how does one equate this when some one says :
He has a very "Strick" teaching style.

I appreciate in advance.
RedWolf
English translation:typo for strict?
Explanation:
Means he follows the rules and won't let anybody else deviate from them, either.
Selected response from:

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 15:44
Grading comment
Well then// point taken.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5typo for strict?
jccantrell
4 +4strictOktay Ardan
3Strick
Susanne Reiche


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
typo for strict?


Explanation:
Means he follows the rules and won't let anybody else deviate from them, either.

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 15:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Well then// point taken.
Notes to answerer
Asker: No. It's not a typo. Here is the direct quote. The old guys took this " strick" approach.

Asker: Here is the word used the first time. He didn't worry about any " Self-Esteem " issues with his students. His teaching methods would be frowned on greatly today, but 25 - 30 years ago, most of the old timers took this " strick " approach, but Clyman waas the master of " tough-love" He said he used" a little sugar , but alot of vinegar to toughen you up" trying to make you meet the demands the town might place on you.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jonathan MacKerron: TYPO TYPO TYPO!
10 mins

agree  Rachel Vanarsdall
44 mins

agree  xxxcmwilliams
49 mins

agree  Sophia Finos
15 hrs

agree  Can Altinbay: Not a typo, but the meaning is right. It's a transliteration of the way people in certain parts pronounce strict.
17 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
strict


Explanation:
I believe you are confusing the term when you say "Strict" means noose. That is not correct. Noose means "Schlinge" in German. If you refer to the sentence as you decribe it, the translation should be "strict", as in firm, disciplined

Oktay Ardan
Canada
Local time: 16:44
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: I am certain It's not a typo, it was repeated, and even referenced aside from the word strict. Perhaps Strick just doesn't fit in my bavarian vocabulary, but I'm not sure how to put this into english best.

Asker: This is only 1 word from German used in English.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Astrid Elke Witte: However, "strick" is in Collins English Dictionary, along with an indication that it is Middle Low German for "rope".
3 mins

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: everything in the sentence points to this being "strict"
7 mins

agree  xxxcmwilliams: Yes, must be "strict". There are loads of examples on the web where "strick" is used when it should be strict - there are over 7,000 hits for "strick rules"!
40 mins

agree  Rachel Vanarsdall: with cmwilliams comment above as well. Often you will find both spellings (right and wrong) in the same page used interchangeably...
44 mins
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28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
strick
Strick


Explanation:
Could this be somebody who developed a special teaching method? In that case, Strick would be a proper name. Just a thought....

Susanne Reiche
Germany
Local time: 00:44
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
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Changes made by editors
Oct 30, 2006 - Changes made by Astrid Elke Witte:
Language pairGerman to English » English


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