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notify to

English translation: notify something to someone

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:be notified to
English translation:notify something to someone
Entered by: Sheila Wilson
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13:25 Dec 30, 2010
English to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: notify to
Hi,

I often read the term "notify to" and I was wondering if it sounds as strange to you as it does to me.

For instance: "The change in the number of study subjects must be notified to the competent authorities." OR "The event was notified to the government."

I am inclined to use the passive in these instances or find another workaround rather than using "notify to" because it sounds unidiomatic to me. Is it an accepted use in legal terminology or is it simply wrong?

Thank you for your input and happy new year.
Lingua.Franca
Spain
Local time: 19:56
notify (sth) to (so)
Explanation:
Perfectly OK in my opinion.

My Oxford gives two usages:

The first is the one you suggested - you notify someone of/about something = inform

The other is also OK - you notify something to someone = report

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Note added at 12 mins (2010-12-30 13:38:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It's not just legal terminology but it is official/formal rather than normal spoken English.

BTW I don't think you can notify someone to someone else - with a person you have to use "report":

The criminal must be reported to the police

The crime must by notified/reported to the police
Selected response from:

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 18:56
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8notify (sth) to (so)
Sheila Wilson
4 +1reported to
Amel Abdullah


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
notify (sth) to (so)


Explanation:
Perfectly OK in my opinion.

My Oxford gives two usages:

The first is the one you suggested - you notify someone of/about something = inform

The other is also OK - you notify something to someone = report

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2010-12-30 13:38:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It's not just legal terminology but it is official/formal rather than normal spoken English.

BTW I don't think you can notify someone to someone else - with a person you have to use "report":

The criminal must be reported to the police

The crime must by notified/reported to the police

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 18:56
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Constantinos Faridis
20 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  The Misha: This is a perfect example of legal speak, and it is widely enough used to be legitimate, whatever we may personally think of it.
35 mins
  -> Thanks. Yes, I think I'd probably phrase things differently but that doesn't make this an error.

agree  Lisa Miles
38 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Tony M: Perfectly correct, normal usage; not specifically 'legalese', just more likely to be encountered in 'official'-type documents, of course. Cf. diseases (etc.) that are 'notifiable'.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks. Yes, I remember that Colorado beetle sightings had to be notified to the Min of Ag in the UK

agree  Sharon Toh, MITI MCIL: Yes. perfectly alright.
5 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Pham Huu Phuoc
13 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  British Diana: My Oxford also gives two usages and the examples given are in the passive, see Discussion
17 hrs
  -> Thanks Diana

agree  Alexandra Taggart: to notify to, to inform, to supply information - I cannot see anything unusual.
3 days 6 hrs
  -> Thanks Alexandra
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
reported to


Explanation:
"Notified to" does not sound correct to me but it may that I am wrong as I do not work with legal documents/terminology. I would change it to "reported to" or (as you suggested) change the construction of the sentence:

The competent authorities must be notified of the change in the number of study subjects.

Perhaps "noted to" could also work:

The change in the number of study subjects must be noted to the competent authorities.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 43 mins (2010-12-30 14:09:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Looking around on the Internet, I see many official government websites using "notify to" in the same context you have provided above. Perhaps it is a regional thing and is not used everywhere in the world.

Amel Abdullah
Jordan
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tina Vonhof: Absolutely: 'the change must be reported to' and 'the government should be notified of'.
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Tina. The phrase still sounds strange to me but it seems that it is actually okay in this context.

neutral  Tony M: 'notify to' is perfectly correct, normal EN.
3 hrs
  -> Thank you, Tony. I'd never heard this phrase before today, but after checking into it I am now convinced that it is okay in this context.
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (2): Tony M, Sharon Toh, MITI MCIL


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Changes made by editors
Jan 9, 2011 - Changes made by Sheila Wilson:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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