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consider / regard

English translation: followed by as

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10:47 Nov 23, 2013
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: consider / regard
I have asked one of my students to do the following gap fill test:

http://www.usingenglish.com/comprehension/39.html

Here is the first paragraph:

Wole Soyinka, who was born in 1934, is a Nigerian writer, poet and playwright. Many 1) __________ him as Africa's most 2) __________ playwright. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1986, the first African writer to win this honour.

These are the options given for gap 1):

1 consider - regard - think - believe

The exercise key shows "regard" as the correct choice. Whys is "consider" not correct, here?

TIA

CT
cynthiatesser
Italy
Local time: 21:34
English translation:followed by as
Explanation:
consider him Africa's ....
regard him as Africa's....

see
http://oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/dictionary/consi...
see "regard or consider" at the bottom of this page:

These two words have the same meaning, but they are used in different patterns and structures. In this meaning consider must be used with a complement or clause: you can consider somebody/something to be something or consider somebody/something as something, although very often the to be or as is left out:He considers himself an expert. ◇ They are considered a high-risk group. You can also consider that somebody/something is something and again, the that can be left out. Regard is used in a narrower range of structures. The most frequent structure is regard somebody/something as something; the as cannot be left out:I regard him a close friend. You cannot regard somebody/something to be something or regard that somebody/something is something. However, regard (but not consider in this meaning) can also be used without a noun or adjective complement but with just an object and adverb (somebody/something is highly regarded) or adverbial phrase (regard somebody/something with suspicion/jealousy/admiration).

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Note added at 22 mins (2013-11-23 11:09:40 GMT)
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another link

http://www.englishforums.com/English/ConsiderVsRegardAs/dcmh...
Selected response from:

Shera Lyn Parpia
Italy
Local time: 21:34
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +6followed by as
Shera Lyn Parpia
2because of asdandamesh


Discussion entries: 11





  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
followed by as


Explanation:
consider him Africa's ....
regard him as Africa's....

see
http://oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/dictionary/consi...
see "regard or consider" at the bottom of this page:

These two words have the same meaning, but they are used in different patterns and structures. In this meaning consider must be used with a complement or clause: you can consider somebody/something to be something or consider somebody/something as something, although very often the to be or as is left out:He considers himself an expert. ◇ They are considered a high-risk group. You can also consider that somebody/something is something and again, the that can be left out. Regard is used in a narrower range of structures. The most frequent structure is regard somebody/something as something; the as cannot be left out:I regard him a close friend. You cannot regard somebody/something to be something or regard that somebody/something is something. However, regard (but not consider in this meaning) can also be used without a noun or adjective complement but with just an object and adverb (somebody/something is highly regarded) or adverbial phrase (regard somebody/something with suspicion/jealousy/admiration).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 mins (2013-11-23 11:09:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

another link

http://www.englishforums.com/English/ConsiderVsRegardAs/dcmh...

Shera Lyn Parpia
Italy
Local time: 21:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Thank you!
Notes to answerer
Asker: I have heard "considered as" many times and if you Google it you get 18 million hits

Asker: For instance, from Wikipedia: He is considered as one of the most influential criminologists of the twentieth century.

Asker: He is considered as the main photographer of the Solidarity movement.

Asker: Shakespeare enjoyed recognition in his own time, but in the 17th century, poets and authors began to consider him as the supreme dramatist and poet of all . I am puzzled ...


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  dandamesh: sorry
4 mins
  -> no problem!

agree  Tony M: It is possible to find occurrences of 'considered as' simply as a fortuitous collocation, but with the meaning intended here it is not standard usage (though it does get used by a depressingly large number of people).
10 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Piyush Ojha: Agree. Fowler, Modern English Usage, also has something to say on this, including examples of 'consider ..... as' from Dickens and Trollope.
11 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  B D Finch: Though "considered as" can occur, it would not be correct in this context.
16 mins
  -> True. Thanks.

agree  Jack Doughty: considered to be...
24 mins
  -> yes, that too! Thanks :)

agree  Phoenix III
2 days3 hrs
  -> Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
because of as


Explanation:
regard.... as

dandamesh
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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