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doing a lap or two of the mat

English translation: running once or twice round the mat

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:doing a lap or two of the mat
English translation:running once or twice round the mat
Entered by: Tony M
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12:49 Dec 7, 2016
English to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: doing a lap or two of the mat
Hello everyone,

John Kavanagh, a famous martial artist and coach, writes in hs book:

"Growing up, I spent all day, every day, running around outside, but I never, ever remember being tired. Nowadays, during their first session in my gym, some kids are on their knees and out of breath after doing a lap or two of the mat. That’s worrying"

http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english...

2 one journey from the beginning to the end of a track used for running, etc.

Does "doing a lap or two of the mat" refer to running around the gym the floor of which is completely covered with mats, or does it refer to doing some exercises ON the mat(s)?

Thank you.
klp
Local time: 02:36
running round the mat
Explanation:
It means running around the circumference of the mat (which is used as the 'ring' in a training gym) — i.e. on the firm gym floor, instead of on the squishier mat.

In fact, it would be harder work running on the mat (think running on a sandy beach!), so that could indeed have been the author's intention here; but I somehow doubt it, as the mat being smaller, the distance would be marginally shorter; the use of the preposition 'of' does however raise that possibility, as if one said 'a lap of the stadium', one would mean running round inside the stadium (not round the outside of it!)

Anyway, the intention is to express a rather small distance that ought not to leave them breathless...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:36
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone.
Thank you, Tony.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +9running round the mat
Tony M
3 +2run around the gym floor once or twice
Dariusz Saczuk


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
running round the mat


Explanation:
It means running around the circumference of the mat (which is used as the 'ring' in a training gym) — i.e. on the firm gym floor, instead of on the squishier mat.

In fact, it would be harder work running on the mat (think running on a sandy beach!), so that could indeed have been the author's intention here; but I somehow doubt it, as the mat being smaller, the distance would be marginally shorter; the use of the preposition 'of' does however raise that possibility, as if one said 'a lap of the stadium', one would mean running round inside the stadium (not round the outside of it!)

Anyway, the intention is to express a rather small distance that ought not to leave them breathless...

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 285
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone.
Thank you, Tony.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dariusz Saczuk
8 mins
  -> Thanks, Darius!

agree  Bashiqa: Sounds like me on Tuesdays when we go to the gym. Note: This is gym for old fogies and it is my daughter who runs the class. Good fun, and it does mean you leave the computer for a while.
24 mins
  -> Thanks, Chris! My, what a novel idea... would never have occurred to me...

agree  Mark Nathan
36 mins
  -> Thanks, Mark!

agree  B D Finch
1 hr
  -> Thanks, B!

agree  danya
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Danya!

agree  Louisa T.
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Louisa!

agree  AllegroTrans
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, C!

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: basically just making the point that kids don't run around in play (on the street) anymore so are totally unfit
10 hrs
  -> Thanks, G!

agree  acetran
2 days 21 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ace!
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
run around the gym floor once or twice


Explanation:
That's the meaning

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2016-12-07 12:58:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

He obviously exagerrates here. What he implies is that martial arts students nowadays are not as physically strongs as. MMA practitioners in the past.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2016-12-07 13:01:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As STRONG as...

Dariusz Saczuk
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in category: 100

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
3 mins
  -> Thank you, Tony.

neutral  B D Finch: As one would not run on the walls or ceiling, "floor" is redundant.// A UK:US difference?
1 hr
  -> It is, but the expression is pretty much a language chunk, widely used in everyday conversation. Thank you for your comment, B D Finch. // Could be.

agree  acetran
2 days 21 hrs
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Non-PRO (1): Tony M


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Changes made by editors
Dec 8, 2016 - Changes made by Tony M:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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