but

English translation: but

04:33 Jul 17, 2018
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: but
Encouraging students to think again prompted them to be less generous to Rokia, but not more generous to everyone else in Mali.

I think this sentence should be Encouraging students to think again prompted them to be more generous to Rokia, but not more generous to everyone else in Mali. What do you think?
Or "but" should be replaced with "and."

The previous text is:
Some other students, also chosen at random, were shown the same two flyers after being told that people are more likely to donate money to an identifiable victim when presented with general information. Those shown the first flyer, for Zambia, Angola, and Mali, gave more or less what that flyer had raised without the warning -$1.26. Those shown the second flyer, for Rokia, after this warmiang gave only $1.36, less than half of what their colleagues ahd commited without it.

Thank you very much for your advice.
Sue-my
Local time: 08:05
English translation:but
Explanation:
From what you seem to be saying, I think 'but' is fine:

on the one hand, it made them more generous to one person... but not to everyone else.

I don't think 'and' would work here — it might if there were opposition: "less generous to A and more generous to B"

An argument could be made for using 'though' instead:

"they were less generous to A, though not (any) more generous to B"

(NB 'any' here has the sense of 'to a greater extent', not the sense of 'not any more' = 'no longer'!)

This would tend to suggest that it might have been expected that statement 1 would result in statement 2, but this was not in fact the case.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:05
Grading comment
Thank you so much! Your anwer is very useful!

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3but
Tony M
4no longer
Nam Vo


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
no longer


Explanation:
I think this is what it is.
prompted them to be less generous to Rokia, but no longer generous to everyone else in Mali.

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Note added at 8 mins (2018-07-17 04:41:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The next part is the clue for my answer:
The students’ reaction is typical of how most of us feel when we are confronted with problems like poverty. Our first instinct is to be gen erous, especially when facing an imperiled seven-year-old girl. But, like the Penn students, our second thought is often that there is really no point: Our contribution would be a drop in the bucket,

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Note added at 9 mins (2018-07-17 04:42:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You can see what they say:
Our first instinct is to be generous
But our second thought is often that there is really no point.


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Note added at 11 mins (2018-07-17 04:44:43 GMT)
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So it prompted them to be less generous to Rokia,
and even more
it prompted them to be not generous anymore to everyone else in Mali.

Nam Vo
Vietnam
Local time: 06:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in VietnameseVietnamese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: That would completely change the meaning from what Asker seems to be suggesting it is intended to be. / There is no sense of 'not any more' = 'no longer' — you are confusing 2 quite different idiomas.
58 mins

agree  GILOU
12 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
but


Explanation:
From what you seem to be saying, I think 'but' is fine:

on the one hand, it made them more generous to one person... but not to everyone else.

I don't think 'and' would work here — it might if there were opposition: "less generous to A and more generous to B"

An argument could be made for using 'though' instead:

"they were less generous to A, though not (any) more generous to B"

(NB 'any' here has the sense of 'to a greater extent', not the sense of 'not any more' = 'no longer'!)

This would tend to suggest that it might have been expected that statement 1 would result in statement 2, but this was not in fact the case.


Tony M
France
Local time: 01:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 285
Grading comment
Thank you so much! Your anwer is very useful!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jack Doughty
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Jack!

agree  AllegroTrans
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, C!

agree  Victoria Britten
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Victoria!

neutral  Tina Vonhof: This would make sense but the context is 'less' generous to Rokia, not 'more'.
8 hrs
  -> Yes, so there is opposition: less to A, but not more to B (instead, say).
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