"a golden bridge beckoned out of it"

English translation: literal sense, a real bridge

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English term or phrase:a golden bridge beckoned out of it
English translation:literal sense, a real bridge
Entered by: Rafa Lombardino

15:03 Apr 24, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - History
English term or phrase: "a golden bridge beckoned out of it"
Hi everybody:

I'm translating a text about the history of the conquistador Cortez, the Spaniard who captured Montezuma in Mexica. I came across this sentence, which says that Montezuma's brother was trying to force the Spanish troops out of their territory: "That same day Cuitlahuac sent several captains to pry Cortez from the city by suggesting that a golden bridge beckoned out of it." My problem here is to know if this "golden bridge" is a physical place or a figure of speech.

Well, if anyone has the time to give me different perspectives regarding this sentence, I would really appreciate it!

Thanks!
Rafa Lombardino
United States
Local time: 19:45
literal sense
Explanation:
Perhaps Cuitlahuac was banking on the conquistadores' greed. After all, they were looking for El Dorado - and the promise of a 'puente dorado' would have been likely to lure them out of the city...
Selected response from:

Ioana Costache
Romania
Grading comment
Thanks everybody! Unfortunately I can only choose one person, so I decided on Ioana, who was the first to respond. I believe it would be a physical place then and Cuitlahuac was probably "offering" Cortez a way out of Mexica before more of the Spaniards got themselves killed. Thanks!
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1a figurative exaltation or a nationalist concealment
smyrna
3 +2literal sense
Ioana Costache
4him
lucasm (X)
3could be physica.
humbird


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
a golden bridge beckoned
literal sense


Explanation:
Perhaps Cuitlahuac was banking on the conquistadores' greed. After all, they were looking for El Dorado - and the promise of a 'puente dorado' would have been likely to lure them out of the city...

Ioana Costache
Romania
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in category: 6
Grading comment
Thanks everybody! Unfortunately I can only choose one person, so I decided on Ioana, who was the first to respond. I believe it would be a physical place then and Cuitlahuac was probably "offering" Cortez a way out of Mexica before more of the Spaniards got themselves killed. Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tehani
4 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
5 days
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
a golden bridge beckoned out of it
him


Explanation:
Grammatcally, you need to let the reader know who or what is being beckoned. It sounds like Cortez is the one being beckoned. Try this:

a golden bridge beckoned him out of the city.

lucasm (X)
Local time: 04:45
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ioana Costache: Not necessarily - "to beckon" can be intransitive, too. http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=beckon
10 mins
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
could be physica.


Explanation:
I agree with Ioana's answer. However, to the point of the asker, because they were so desperate to rescue the captured King-demi-god, they must had named some hidden place where a bridge is actually made of gold. What size could that be I have no idea. Maybe a miniature sized one to be used at a ceremony, or could be a size at least the King or highest priest alone could pass.
Given the amount of gold Spaniard found there, this could be possibility.

humbird
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
a golden bridge beckoned out of it
a figurative exaltation or a nationalist concealment


Explanation:
To tackle with fictional texts, its best to look back on the author's tone, style, even his/her perspective on life. A deatailed search on Aztec civilization and herementioned characters will spread light on what you really are into.I scent a metaphorical usage in this context mixed with nationalism and exaltaion imposed by the author himself on bias since to my knowledge , never in the history of mexico was a golden bridge built up save for a make-shift one. take a look at this side http://www.dushkin.com/text-data/articles/16361/16361.pdf

smyrna
Local time: 05:45

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio: Likely metaphorical. Cortes knew there was no actual bridge of gold. However, when he and his men were attacked on that causeway he had the premonition about, those of the men who were too laden down with gold were the ones who drowned. A "bridge of gold"
9 hrs
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