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bright on

English translation: see comment

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11:46 Oct 29, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
History / Great Britain
English term or phrase: bright on
I heard that the name of Brighton (town in England- well now considered to be a city) comea from the expression 'bright on'. Does anyone know how this came about?

Is it because when people came to that place and saw sea in front of them they thought of brightness extending in front of their eyes??? (It is just my theory)???
Miroslawa Jodlowiec
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:44
English translation:see comment
Explanation:
Brighton began as a Saxon village. The Saxons conquered Sussex in the 5th century AD. One of them was called Beorthelm. He owned a farm (in Saxon a tun) called Beorthelm's tun which, in time grew into the town of Brighton.

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Note added at 11 mins (2004-10-29 11:57:12 GMT)
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http://www.localhistories.org/brighton.html

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Note added at 1 hr 34 mins (2004-10-29 13:21:05 GMT)
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tun is the Old English word for an enclosure, a farm or an estate. The names ending in tun are held to belong to the period of Anglo-Saxon expansion from the 8th century AD and probably continued in use as a new element in names after the Norman Conquest.

Selected response from:

xxxgulser
Grading comment
Thanks to all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +7see comment
xxxgulser
5 +1Brighthelmston
Mathew Robinson
4Origin from "bright helmet" / the "bright town"
AnnikaLight


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Origin from "bright helmet" / the "bright town"


Explanation:
Origin: A town on the coast of Sussex, England, anciently called Brightelmstone, from Brithelm, i. e., bright helmet, who was bishop of Bath and Wells, about the year 955. The bright town.



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Note added at 6 mins (2004-10-29 11:52:20 GMT)
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http://www.last-names.net/surname.asp?surname=Brighton

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Note added at 8 mins (2004-10-29 11:54:26 GMT)
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http://www.sacklunch.net/placenames/B/Brighton.html

Meaning of Place Name: Brighton
Brighton: Formerly Brighthelmston, from a personal name. A city and watering-place in Sussex, England, situated on the English Channel. It is the leading seaside resort in Great Britain.

AnnikaLight
Germany
Local time: 18:44
Works in field
Native speaker of: German
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Brighthelmston


Explanation:
Brighton, East Sussex (where I live) is a contraction of the original Anglo-Saxon name Brighthelmston, Beorthelm's homestead.


    Reference: http://www.regencybrighton.com/squares/bhelm1792.html
    Reference: http://www.brighton-net.com/history/history.htm
Mathew Robinson
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:44

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Orla Ryan
1 hr
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
see comment


Explanation:
Brighton began as a Saxon village. The Saxons conquered Sussex in the 5th century AD. One of them was called Beorthelm. He owned a farm (in Saxon a tun) called Beorthelm's tun which, in time grew into the town of Brighton.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2004-10-29 11:57:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.localhistories.org/brighton.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 34 mins (2004-10-29 13:21:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

tun is the Old English word for an enclosure, a farm or an estate. The names ending in tun are held to belong to the period of Anglo-Saxon expansion from the 8th century AD and probably continued in use as a new element in names after the Norman Conquest.




    Reference: http://www.picturesofengland.com/history/brighton-history.ht...
xxxgulser
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks to all!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Moore: I'll go with this...
11 mins
  -> thx

agree  DGK T-I: "Ton (A.S.), a place surrounded by a hedge or palisade, a town / village"
1 hr
  -> thx

agree  Christopher Crockett: Following up on Giuli's observation, "ton" appears to be the A.S./O.E. equivalent of the medieval Latin "villa", which was not a rich person's country house, but a rural estate or village. All the French towns ending in "-ville" derive from this usage.
2 hrs
  -> thx

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
4 hrs
  -> thx

agree  Balaban Cerit
9 hrs
  -> thx

agree  Mario Marcolin
1 day 21 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  Peter Linton: As in my surname, which means "linen farm"
2 days 8 hrs
  -> thx
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