take-up

English translation: advantage taken of an opportunity proposed

22:10 Dec 4, 2005
English language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
Social Sciences - Human Resources
English term or phrase: take-up
we will monitor recruitment, promotion, training opportunities and **take-up**, grievances, disciplinary procedures and exit from employment.
We will improve the monitoring of service **take up** and use.

Could you kindly explain what does take-up and take up mean in these sentences please?
Thank you
Mariana Leclerk
Selected answer:advantage taken of an opportunity proposed
Explanation:
In this context, 'take-up' (WITH hyphen) means the extent to which the company (etc.) is 'taken up' on its offered services (training opportunities, etc.)

In other words, 20 people were offered training, but only 15 of them accepted; thus the take-up was 75%

adoption
acceptance


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Note added at 10 mins (2005-12-04 22:20:14 GMT)
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Note carefully the way the commas puncutating the first example indicate this is "opportunities for training... and the take-up of them..."; the take-up is NOT associated with the 'grievances, etc.'

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Note added at 13 mins (2005-12-04 22:23:13 GMT)
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Of course, I've been explaining the verb 'to take up' --- here, the hyphenated form is the noun, meaning 'the degree to which [an offer] is taken up (= accepted)"

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Note added at 18 mins (2005-12-04 22:28:12 GMT)
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They are going to monitor what training is being offered to employees, and to what extent the employees are taking advantage of what is on offer!

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Note added at 23 mins (2005-12-04 22:33:09 GMT)
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As Nikos has helpfully pointed out, the second occurrence ought to be hyphenated as well (or neither of them!)

the verb is 'to take up'
(non-separable -- we'd say 'to take up an option', cf. separable verb 'to take a cup of tea up to someone ill in bed')

the noun (and adjective) is 'take-up'

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Note added at 32 mins (2005-12-04 22:42:59 GMT)
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Although many instances are indeed to be found on Google in domaines UK, CA, AU and NZ, not to mention Europe globally, do note that the illustrious University of Michigan is among a number of US sites using the noun in this way...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 21:10
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
5 +9advantage taken of an opportunity proposed
Tony M
5(accepted offers of) actual employment
KathyT
5 -2To start to deal with
Anna Maria Augustine (X)
4 -2deal with/ handle/ consider
RHELLER


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
To start to deal with


Explanation:
*

Anna Maria Augustine (X)
France
Local time: 21:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Please see my own answer for suggestion
3 mins

disagree  Ian M-H (X): "monitor ... training opportunities start to deal with" and "monitoring of service start to deal with" make no sense IMO
10 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
advantage taken of an opportunity proposed


Explanation:
In this context, 'take-up' (WITH hyphen) means the extent to which the company (etc.) is 'taken up' on its offered services (training opportunities, etc.)

In other words, 20 people were offered training, but only 15 of them accepted; thus the take-up was 75%

adoption
acceptance


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 mins (2005-12-04 22:20:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note carefully the way the commas puncutating the first example indicate this is "opportunities for training... and the take-up of them..."; the take-up is NOT associated with the 'grievances, etc.'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 mins (2005-12-04 22:23:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course, I've been explaining the verb 'to take up' --- here, the hyphenated form is the noun, meaning 'the degree to which [an offer] is taken up (= accepted)"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2005-12-04 22:28:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

They are going to monitor what training is being offered to employees, and to what extent the employees are taking advantage of what is on offer!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 mins (2005-12-04 22:33:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Nikos has helpfully pointed out, the second occurrence ought to be hyphenated as well (or neither of them!)

the verb is 'to take up'
(non-separable -- we'd say 'to take up an option', cf. separable verb 'to take a cup of tea up to someone ill in bed')

the noun (and adjective) is 'take-up'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 32 mins (2005-12-04 22:42:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Although many instances are indeed to be found on Google in domaines UK, CA, AU and NZ, not to mention Europe globally, do note that the illustrious University of Michigan is among a number of US sites using the noun in this way...

Tony M
France
Local time: 21:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 50
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: yes, you are right - it is a noun - actually referring to the rate//that comment about the degree was really rude
1 min
  -> Thanks, Rita! If your preception was 'rude', I apologize publicly and unreservedly; I would have hoped you'd have known that I have FAR TOO MUCH RESPECT FOR YOU to ever be knowingly rude to you

agree  Dave Calderhead: Well done Dusrty - You took up the gauntlet of the question to good advantage! (;-{)>//Except perhaps a degree of knowledge gained over a useful life?
2 mins
  -> Thanks, Dave! // And thanks for the compliment... A BA in life, perhaps? No, I was just a lecturer in a University, so I got PAID for being there ;-)

agree  Charlesp
47 mins
  -> Thanks, Charles!

agree  Enza Longo
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Enza!

agree  Sara Noss
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Babagaya!

agree  Nikos Mastrakoulis: Kudos...
1 hr
  -> Efharisto, Nikos!

neutral  Anna Maria Augustine (X): If you have to make that many addendums and can't even apologise when you're rude, then get rid of the superiority complex.
3 hrs
  -> Please keep your comments linguistic, Anna!

agree  Bianca Jacobsohn
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Bianca!

agree  LJC
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Lesley!

agree  Cristina Chaplin
13 hrs
  -> Thanks, Awana!
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1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
deal with/ handle/ consider


Explanation:
I have a degree in Human Resources

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Note added at 22 mins (2005-12-04 22:33:02 GMT)
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I gave you the U.S. definition
in the UK they are referring to the take-up RATE (implied)
and that fits better with the second "take up"

£200 for non work related training and development. Alison spoke about the take up rates being low: ... Calls may be monitored for training purposes ...
www.eoc.org.uk/Default.aspx?page=17992&theme=print - 19k - Dec 2, 2005 - Cached - Similar pages


scope... and 20 (25 if in further/higher education or training) will be able to claim ... Resources Survey estimated that the take up rates for Disability Living ...
www.scope.org.uk/cgi-bin/eatsoup.cgi?id=1107

Specifically monitor recruitment, promotion, and training opportunities and take up of training, pay, grievance, disciplinary and exit from employment. ...
www.tameside.gov.uk/tmbc6/equaloppor.htm

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Note added at 28 mins (2005-12-04 22:39:02 GMT)
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In response to Dusty's comment about a degree - my degree is in U.S. Human Resources and we do not use that term. If askers would specify country of origin of text, we wouldn't have these eternal discussions.

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Note added at 8 hrs 10 mins (2005-12-05 06:20:30 GMT)
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after having referred to website references, I would define take up as "participation level"

Note to Dave: your ref is definitely European: "by the end of 2004, competitors, particularly in the UK where 3 has slashed its prices"
and refers to Sky,...European rivals such as Vodafone and Deutsche Telekom
Note to Dusty: your refs largely refer to work done by Janet Curry (from Toronto),2003. The take-up of Social Benefits. NBER Working Paper No. w10488. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; also refers to work done by Wim Van Oorschot, Netherlands (1991).
Just because something is on the U of Mich website doesn't mean it originated in the United States.

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 13:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rebecca Barath
2 mins
  -> thanks Rebecca!

disagree  Nikos Mastrakoulis: Note: It would seem that the second instance of "take-up" in the example given was accidentally not hyphenated. Am I wrong? // Both instances seem grammatically identical to me... // Sorry, thought you meant "deal*ing* with" etc...
3 mins
  -> both nouns (UK-specific)

disagree  Tony M: Please see my own answer for suggestion :-) // Univ. Mich. (inter al.) uses it in connection with Hispanic/non-Hispanic, white/black etc. workers
4 mins
  -> sorry - we have "to take up " in the U.S....we do NOT have "the take-up"

disagree  Dave Calderhead: This is what take up usually means in a normal sentence, as in take up your bed and walk - but asker wants 'jargon' meaning in management speak (:-{(> see www.lucent.com/livelink/090094038008c7e6_Newsletter.pdf for driving take-up of their products
22 mins
  -> this is a UK government website, and is used as a noun
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2 days 1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
(accepted offers of) actual employment


Explanation:
is the meaning here.

KathyT
Australia
Local time: 07:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
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