strength

English translation: Strength

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23:52 Apr 13, 2018
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Human Resources
English term or phrase: strength
The word "strength" is used in the context of human characteristics like talent.

For English native speakers,
What is difference between "strength" and "gift"?

Does "gift" have any religious sound?
Yayo84
Japan
English translation:Strength
Explanation:
A gift is an ability that you possess innately (which may then be nurtured and strengthened through a conscious decision and/or training to strengthen it). A strength is an ability or characteristic you have that you or those around you are conscious of, which you deploy for your own or other people's benefit.
I think in the past, when people were more generally religious, people would often attribute the innate ability to a higher being (the phrase "God-given gift" was fairly common) - but today, in modern Britain at least, that is no longer the case. The debate is all about nature v. nurture, and whether through sheer practice a person can achieve as much as a person who is naturally gifted.
Selected response from:

suew
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:45
Grading comment
Thank you for your help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +1Strength
suew


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 day 7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Strength


Explanation:
A gift is an ability that you possess innately (which may then be nurtured and strengthened through a conscious decision and/or training to strengthen it). A strength is an ability or characteristic you have that you or those around you are conscious of, which you deploy for your own or other people's benefit.
I think in the past, when people were more generally religious, people would often attribute the innate ability to a higher being (the phrase "God-given gift" was fairly common) - but today, in modern Britain at least, that is no longer the case. The debate is all about nature v. nurture, and whether through sheer practice a person can achieve as much as a person who is naturally gifted.

suew
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:45
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you for your help!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you! I thought gift may mean "God-given gift". I'm very glad to know today's meaning from you.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tina Vonhof
15 hrs
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