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to cost a bob or two

English translation: to cost quite a bit of money

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11:47 May 16, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
English term or phrase: to cost a bob or two
Does it mean "very expensive"?
Tsogt Gombosuren
Canada
Local time: 08:18
English translation:to cost quite a bit of money
Explanation:
"Bob" is old British slang for a shilling. "To cost a bob or two" means to "to cost quite a bit of money"
Selected response from:

xxxIanW
Local time: 16:18
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +16to cost quite a bit of moneyxxxIanW
5 +3expensive
Angela Dickson


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +16
to cost quite a bit of money


Explanation:
"Bob" is old British slang for a shilling. "To cost a bob or two" means to "to cost quite a bit of money"

xxxIanW
Local time: 16:18
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Armorel Young: a nice bit of typical British understatement - like saying "we've got a spot of bother" when you mean "we're in deep trouble"
2 mins
  -> Yes, like Jeeves' "most disturbing, sir"

agree  Tony M
3 mins

agree  Aisha Maniar
5 mins

agree  xxxcmwilliams
12 mins

agree  Kirill Semenov
14 mins

agree  NancyLynn
21 mins

agree  xxxCateA
31 mins

agree  Ian Burley
39 mins

agree  Michael Bailey
59 mins

agree  Robert Donahue
1 hr

agree  Andy Watkinson: Or "it's a little chilly" at ten below zero.
1 hr

agree  Charlie Bavington: a moderately reasonable explanation :-)
1 hr

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
3 hrs

agree  Can Altinbay: They also say "cost a pretty penny". Charlie, are you having too much fun? :)
3 hrs

agree  xxxtr.: a nice example of said understatement ('quid' instead of 'bob'): "Posh and Becks aren't short of a quid or two either, as the list reckons they've got £65 million between them"!
8 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
3 days3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
expensive


Explanation:
Yes it does! This is British English, and a classic understatement. 'Bob' is an old word meaning a shilling (unit of currency before 1971 in the UK, worth what is now 5 pence).

Angela Dickson
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:18
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxCateA
22 mins

agree  Robert Donahue
1 hr

agree  Can Altinbay
3 hrs
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