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" at you " or " on you "

English translation: with you

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20:16 Nov 20, 2001
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing - Internet, e-Commerce / WWW
English term or phrase: " at you " or " on you "
i want ro ask you about the sentence which is "i am angry at you" can u tell me is it right or wrong ? or can i say "i am angry on you"
both are same or not if both are same then could you please explain in the detail in which situation we can use anyone sentence ? please tell me as soon as possible i am writing you 2nd time bcoz u did not reply me b4.
thanks
Yaser Hayat
English translation:with you
Explanation:
The correct usage is the following:
I am angry with you.

Here are some examples of the usage of prepositions (from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English):

He was angry at being kept waiting.
He was angry with himself for having made such a foolish mistake.
He will be angry to learn that you have disobeyed his orders.
Selected response from:

Aleksander Vasiljevic
Serbia
Local time: 00:21
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +8with you
Aleksander Vasiljevic
5 +1angry with you / mad at youDan McCrosky
5this is what the Combinatory dictionary says
Rostislau Golod
4I am angry with youMona Helal
4Definitely "at you"
Floriana


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Definitely "at you"


Explanation:
To be angry AT someone, not ON someone.



Floriana
United States
Local time: 17:21
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
with you


Explanation:
The correct usage is the following:
I am angry with you.

Here are some examples of the usage of prepositions (from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English):

He was angry at being kept waiting.
He was angry with himself for having made such a foolish mistake.
He will be angry to learn that you have disobeyed his orders.

Aleksander Vasiljevic
Serbia
Local time: 00:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in HungarianHungarian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yuri Geifman: good point
32 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Fuad Yahya: good examples
44 mins
  -> They must be :-) Thanks

agree  Utopia Lau: good examples
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  MJ Barber
3 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Atacama: Excellent!
6 hrs
  -> Many thanks

agree  Floriana: Definitely, "with" as well.
10 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  john mason
16 hrs

agree  Tatiana Neroni
118 days
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
I am angry with you


Explanation:
This should be the right way to say that you are not happy with someone.

Angry on: cannot be used in English. Even though 'on' is the right preposition to use after 'angry' in Arabic, and it would be wrong to use it in English.

Angry at: again is not 100% acceptable in English in such a sentence. If you want to use 'at' the sentence would be:
I am angry at what you did/have done.

HTH

Mona Helal
Local time: 10:21
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
angry with you / mad at you


Explanation:
English is again terribly illogical here. As I tried to explain before, this site is a poor way to try to learn English. The answers you are getting are not all correct or complete (see the question on do/have).

"on you" is definitely wrong in all cases.

With a personal object like "you", meaning the person being spoken to, there are two expressions that mean EXACTLY the same thing. One is somewhat more formal than the other:

1. "I am angry with you." (somewhat more formal 2. below) – with the modifier "angry", you must use "with"

2. "I am mad at you." (somewhat less formal than 1. above) – with the modifier "mad" (which means the same as "angry"), you must use "at"

If your sentence has a different type of object; a person, act, or thing ABOUT which the speaker is angry = mad, then the sentence is constructed with "about":

"I am angry/mad ABOUT what Jim said."

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 00:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Graham
1 hr
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
this is what the Combinatory dictionary says


Explanation:
adj. to become, get angry 2. angry ABOUT, AT, WITH, FOR
eg. He was angry at/with his neighbours about the noisy party.
We were angry at being disturbed . She was angry at/with me for being late.

ALSO
3. angry + to inf. I was angry to learn of his refusal
4. + that clause I was angry that our request had been rejected

Reference: The BBI Combinatory dictionary of English by Morton Benson , Evelyn Benson, Robert Ilson

Rostislau Golod
Local time: 02:21
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in BelarusianBelarusian
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