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Good Morning

English translation: Good morning

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Good Morning
English translation:Good morning
Entered by: Maya Jurt
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

00:41 Nov 22, 2001
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing - Internet, e-Commerce / WWW
English term or phrase: Good Morning
I want to ask you about the " Good Morning " can u tell me one thing that suppose someone's morning, noon, evening i start good bcoz of some situation like anyones death or accident. so wat should we say except good morning ? some persons says u can say good morning with ur sad mood. is it right or wrong pleas tell me about it in detail and as soon as possible.
thanks
Yaser Hayat
Good morning
Explanation:
It is the standard greeting and nowbody thinks about good or bad, joy or gloom by saying it. It would be especially akward if you would replace it by something not used in normal circumstances.

If you feel deeply for a beraved person, just meet him/her, take both hands in yours and do not say good morning, but give your condolences with a few words.

No, definitely, good morning cannot be replaced, just omitted.
Selected response from:

Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 05:55
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Good morning; how are you doing?
TransHispania
4 +3Good morning
Maya Jurt
4 +2hello / how are you?
Sheila Hardie
4 +1'morning
edlih_be


  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
'morning


Explanation:
I suppose this is simply a case of being sensitive to the feelings of others.
People do say 'good morning' even when there has been a death or an accident. However, I would advise you to miss the 'good', and simply say 'morning'.
The meaning is the same, and it is understood by all.

edlih_be
Local time: 05:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheila Hardie
10 mins

disagree  Liv Bliss: In England, at least, "Morning" is considered a somewhat off-handed, casual greeting, which can demonstrate disrespect to anyone but a fairly close acquaintance. So do be careful how you use it.
6 hrs
  -> I was raised and educated in England, to BA Hons level. I have first-hand experience of 'morning' being used. It all depends upon one's expression when one says the word. Even 'good morning' can sound off-handed, if said in a certain manner.

agree  pteed: Not off-hand,a little casual but immensely respects the position of the bereaved.
6 days
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
hello / how are you?


Explanation:
I think you could even substitute Good Morning with hello or how are you? It depends on how close to the original you need to get. I agree with the previous answer in that Good Morning can been used even in cases when something tragic has happened.

Hope this helps,

Sheila

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 05:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  amarilis
4 hrs
  -> thanks:)

neutral  Maya Jurt: And the answer will be: "Just fine", coming from smeone bereaved.
7 hrs
  -> Not necessarily, Maya, if you ask someone how they are in a caring way it does not have to sound like a flippant cliché, rather genuine concern for their well-being.

agree  TransHispania
14 hrs
  -> thanks:)
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57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Good morning


Explanation:
It is the standard greeting and nowbody thinks about good or bad, joy or gloom by saying it. It would be especially akward if you would replace it by something not used in normal circumstances.

If you feel deeply for a beraved person, just meet him/her, take both hands in yours and do not say good morning, but give your condolences with a few words.

No, definitely, good morning cannot be replaced, just omitted.

Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 05:55
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sven Petersson
52 mins
  -> Thanks Sven, nice evening to you

agree  Liv Bliss: No standard greeting is necessary under particularly sad circumstances. One often notices TV morning show interviewers saying "good morning" to someone who has just experienced a horrible loss, and it sounds awful to me.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, and when someone ask the standard question "How are you" you are supposed to say: "just fine", while feeling lousy. Why do we ask if we do not want to hear the answer?

neutral  Sheila Hardie: I think by asking how they are in a genuine way does not imply they have to say 'just fine' if they are not, as in this case. It really depends on your tone of voice, body language etc. Words aren't everything here, attitude is perhaps more important.
9 hrs
  -> Absolutely agree. Attitude is all. I meant that for our every day dealings.

agree  TransHispania
13 hrs
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Good morning; how are you doing?


Explanation:
I think that you can keep saying "Good morning": it is a way of showing that you are always being kind to that person (intentions are important).

You can combine with asking the person how she is doing: however, you have to see whether it is appropriate to do so (sometimes it is better not to ask too many things, if it isn't a very close relationship - somehow the other person may want to keep a private space). The most important thing is your gestures, to show to the other person that somehow you are present and available to help her.

We need to distinguish here between salutations as a social phenomenon (the form and intensity varies a lot between cultures: mediterranean, where even strangers really take time to greet themselves; vs nordic/anglosaxon cultures; the chinese culture, etc), and our personal intentions, the way we enter in a relationship with other people; what we make out of these social rituals.

If you are a person who is really considerate about other people (there is a lot of sense of hospitality in the oriental cultures), be as you are, and do not let yourself be influenced by people who are otherwise.

TransHispania
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Estes: This is the first phrase that leapt to mind when I read the query. "Goodmorning" is understood (or should be understood) not as a commentary on the quality of the morning, but a wish from the speaker to the receiver. Yours was a very thoughtful answer.
5 days

agree  Milana_R
8 days
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