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period vs. tenure

English translation: term

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01:13 Dec 2, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Patents, Trademarks, Copyright
English term or phrase: period vs. tenure
In reference to the length of time in which a contract is in effect, which one is used?

period of contractual operation
or
tenure of contractual operation

And what about 'tenor' - apart from the musical context.

Thanks.
Ramona Ali
Local time: 21:07
English translation:term
Explanation:
I would use neither "period" nor "tenure". If you are talking about "the length of time in which a contract is in effect", then I would think the term would be "term", i.e. the term of the contract. ;-)

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Note added at 6 hrs 54 mins (2004-12-02 08:08:11 GMT)
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Also see: http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&hl=de&ie=UTF...
:-)

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Note added at 6 hrs 58 mins (2004-12-02 08:12:24 GMT)
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If you take a look at the link above, you will notice that quite a few of the links have the exact wording you are looking for, i.e. \"...during the term of the contract\".
Selected response from:

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 15:07
Grading comment
Thanks to all.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2comment
Judith Kerman
4 +2Period is very general; tenure is highly specific; tenor is used in literally a couple of phrasesVictor Potapov
3 +2term
Derek Gill Franßen
3 +1contract validity periodCharlie Bavington


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
comment


Explanation:
Definitely not "tenor"

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Note added at 7 mins (2004-12-02 01:21:38 GMT)
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I\'m inclined to think \"period\" rather then \"tenure\" unless it\'s a personnel contract. But I defer to people who know legal language better than I do.


    Reference: http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=tenor
Judith Kerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Victor Potapov: Hello Judith, not necessarily: there are cases (e.g. financial terminology) when "tenor" means just that - "duration". Two example would include "L/C tenor" (letter of credit validity period) and "loan tenor" - duration of a loan.
3 mins
  -> I guess my dictionary isn't technical enough. I'll bet it's a misspelling that got canonized. Thanks!

neutral  hanim: agree with victor, 'tenor' is normally used in banking and/or conveyancing agreements.
6 mins
  -> Thanks! I just found out that "haircut" is a real business term, too - I learn something new every day.

agree  Richard Benham: If you use shares a security instead of a margin deposit, their value is discounted or given a "haircut". Is that what you meant?
17 mins
  -> I think maybe - I frankly didn't understand the explanation (or yours - which is why I try to stay away from margin trading). But financial, anyway.

agree  Trada inc.: an enjoyable discussion
45 mins
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Period is very general; tenure is highly specific; tenor is used in literally a couple of phrases


Explanation:
Better still, use the phrase "duration of a contract" :-)

As my physics teacher joked once about our classes of Russian language: "Hey, that class is so easy, it's a joke: see, if you don't know how to spell "artillerist" you can always write "soldier manning the guns"!

:-)

Seriously,

"Period" is about as universal as "duration".
"Tenure" would be very legalistic and clumsy. I would not hesitate to use "tenure" only when speaking about a lifelong contract (e.g. professor's tenure).
"Tenor" is a highly specific word - never saw it out of financial context, e.g. "L/C (letter of credit) tenor" or "syndicated loans with tenor of 5 to 7 years". Better leave it there - in finance-speak.

Hope this helps!

Good luck,


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Note added at 20 mins (2004-12-02 01:34:41 GMT)
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Gee, did not see the answers you guys posted when I was writing mine! Well done!

Victor Potapov
Russian Federation
Local time: 16:07
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Judith Kerman: Since law-related definitions of "tenor" include "The exact meaning or actual wording of a document as distinct from its effect" and "An exact copy of a document" (at least per dictionary.com) I HOPE it's rarely used to mean duration. Talk about confusion
15 mins
  -> Yes, my dictionary (English>Russian Legal) gives both "exact meaning" and "duration, validity period of loan, bill of exchange, letter of credit". Indeed multiple meanings. However, context defines meaning - so confusion can be usually kept at bay.

agree  Trada inc.: interesting remarks//of course, Victor
34 mins
  -> Thanks! I hope (no: I'm sure) you were meaning that in a positive way! :-)))

agree  Java Cafe
3 hrs
  -> Thank you!
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
contract validity period


Explanation:
Sounds like the sort of thing that you are trying to express.
But rather depends on the exact context.

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Note added at 20 mins (2004-12-02 01:34:07 GMT)
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Ah, now you\'ve posted some more!
I think I\'d use \"contract\'s validity period\", then.

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Note added at 21 mins (2004-12-02 01:34:57 GMT)
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Ah, now you\'ve posted some more!
I think I\'d use \"contract\'s validity period\", then.

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Note added at 24 mins (2004-12-02 01:37:49 GMT)
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For your phrases though, I\'d use \"while the contract is in force\" to replace everything from \"throughout...\" in the 1st and \"during...\" in the 2nd

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 14:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trada inc.
33 mins
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
term


Explanation:
I would use neither "period" nor "tenure". If you are talking about "the length of time in which a contract is in effect", then I would think the term would be "term", i.e. the term of the contract. ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs 54 mins (2004-12-02 08:08:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also see: http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&hl=de&ie=UTF...
:-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs 58 mins (2004-12-02 08:12:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If you take a look at the link above, you will notice that quite a few of the links have the exact wording you are looking for, i.e. \"...during the term of the contract\".

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 15:07
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks to all.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  zaphod: Finally! Someone who SPEAKS ENGLISH!
49 mins
  -> Thank you very much Zaphod! "If there's anything more important than my ego, I want it caught and shot now." - Zaphod Beeblebrox ;-)

agree  nrabate: Someone who speaks English and knows the law
12 hrs
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