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police provocation: police agent or someone else in cooperation with the police

English translation: Entrapment

17:54 Apr 18, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
English term or phrase: police provocation: police agent or someone else in cooperation with the police
bribes somebody in a coordinated and registered manner.

How to name the entire process? Not a provocation; something like "controlled presenting"?
Andrzej Lejman
Local time: 17:08
English translation:Entrapment
Explanation:
Seems to be what you are looking for:

Entrapment

The inducement, by law enforcement officers or their agents, of another person to commit a crime for the purposes of bringing charges for the commission of that artificially-provoked crime. This technique, because it involves abetting the commission of a crime, which is itself a crime, is severely curtailed under the constitutional law of many states.
Selected response from:

Drunya
Grading comment
This is great and is exactly what I was looking for!

Many thanks to all.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4Entrapment
Drunya
5agent provocateur
Lietta Warren-Granato
4"controlled" was correct
Tatiana Nero (X)
4inducement on the part of (police) agent
Mihaela Brooks
3 +1perhaps?
Robert Donahue (X)


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Entrapment


Explanation:
Seems to be what you are looking for:

Entrapment

The inducement, by law enforcement officers or their agents, of another person to commit a crime for the purposes of bringing charges for the commission of that artificially-provoked crime. This technique, because it involves abetting the commission of a crime, which is itself a crime, is severely curtailed under the constitutional law of many states.

Drunya
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
This is great and is exactly what I was looking for!

Many thanks to all.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  madak
1 hr
  -> Thank you

agree  Can Altinbay: That was what I thought of first.
1 hr
  -> Great minds think alike :-)))

agree  Alp Berker
3 hrs

agree  sarahl (X)
10 hrs

neutral  Tatiana Nero (X): there is a difference if the "induced" person was in fact prone to committing such a crime or he/she was solicited by the police but would not otherwise have committed such a crime. With no additional context we cannot be sure it's entrapment here.
19 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
perhaps?


Explanation:
I'm not sure what you're looking for exactly (blackmail of a criminal by the police? or a criminal bribing the police?). Here are some ideas for you.

systematic bribery/pattern of bribery (if you are talking about a regular system of bribes going to the police).

A criminal who provides information to the police is called a Police Informant (or Confidential Informant, aka a CI).


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Note added at 9 mins (2005-04-18 18:03:51 GMT)
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If the Police are using their authority to get money from the criminal then this would be extortion.
ex·tor·tion
n.
The act or an instance of extorting.
Illegal use of one\'s official position or powers to obtain property, funds, or patronage.
An excessive or exorbitant charge.
Something extorted.


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Note added at 10 mins (2005-04-18 18:04:21 GMT)
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so then \"systematic extortion/pattern of extortion\"

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Note added at 2 hrs 15 mins (2005-04-18 20:09:57 GMT)
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Drunya is correct, if a police officer (or someone acting as their agent) induces someone to commit a crime then that is entrapment. I don\'t know how the bribe part fits in though.

Agent provocateur is more espionage related, rather than police related.

That said, in the absence of clearer context it\'s hard to say exactly what the asker is looking for.

Robert Donahue (X)
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gtreyger (X)
2 hrs
  -> Thank you Gennadiy
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
agent provocateur


Explanation:
agent provocateur is a person connected with the police (often a police officer) who induces a criminal to commit a crime. For instance, an undercover policeman goes to buy drugs from a drug dealer: the policeman is 'provoking' the criminal to commict the crime, so he can catch him in the act.

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Note added at 2 hrs 3 mins (2005-04-18 19:57:33 GMT)
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a-gent pro-vo-ca-teur n. pl. <a-gents pro-vo-ca-teurs
1. a secret agent hired to incite suspected
persons to some illegal action that will
make them liable to punishment.

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Note added at 2 hrs 34 mins (2005-04-18 20:28:21 GMT)
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provocateur

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Note added at 2 hrs 35 mins (2005-04-18 20:29:24 GMT)
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http://www.answers.com/topic/agent-provocateur

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Note added at 2 hrs 38 mins (2005-04-18 20:32:57 GMT)
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I am sure I have heard native English speakers living in England using \'agent provocateur\' in this context, referring to policemen. The newspapers in England also use this term. The problem is that not only there is no context, but we don\'t know whether the asker is interested in US English or UK English...

Lietta Warren-Granato
Italy
Local time: 17:08
Native speaker of: Italian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rafal Korycinski: I think, that nowadays "agent provocateur" is rather this: http://www.agentprovocateur.com/
5 mins
  -> I couldn't access the website, but if you are referring to the 'S&M wear' shop in Islington (London) I have been there! But the shop/website/company takes its name from what I have explained, believe it or not!
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
inducement on the part of (police) agent


Explanation:
the context contains the word ''bribe''....


    Reference: http://www.lectlaw.com/def/e024.htm
Mihaela Brooks
Canada
Local time: 11:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
"controlled" was correct


Explanation:
A controlled sale, bribe etc., a police set-up.

As to "entrapment", it's a defense in a criminal case which has yet to be proven by the Defendant's counsel (see my comment above for "Entrapment").

There is nothing in the original text that would clearly qualify it as an entrapment.

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Note added at 19 hrs 59 mins (2005-04-19 13:53:56 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Or - \"controlled bribe through a police agent\"

Tatiana Nero (X)
Local time: 11:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 16
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