liabilities outstanding against

English translation: any liabilities (which are still) owed by the company

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:liabilities outstanding against
Selected answer:any liabilities (which are still) owed by the company
Entered by: Yvonne Gallagher

19:58 Sep 8, 2013
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
English term or phrase: liabilities outstanding against
Dear colleagues

I am currently translating a text written by a non-native speaker and I'd like to check how you understand the following sentence...

The letter shows any and all liabilities outstanding *against* the Company.

Does this mean that a) the Company owes sums of money etc. or that b) money is owed to the Company? My research suggests a), but I'd like to double-check.

Thanks!
innsbruck
any liabilities (which are still) owed by the company
Explanation:
so A

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Note added at 1 hr (2013-09-08 21:03:04 GMT)
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Definition of 'Liability'
A company's legal debts or obligations that arise during the course of business operations. Liabilities are settled over time through the transfer of economic benefits including money, goods or services.
Investopedia Says
Investopedia explains 'Liability'
Recorded on the balance sheet (right side), liabilities include loans, accounts payable, mortgages, deferred revenues and accrued expenses. Liabilities are a vital aspect of a company's operations because they are used to finance operations and pay for large expansions. They can also make transactions between businesses more efficient. For example, the outstanding money that a company owes to its suppliers would be considered a liability.
http://www.investopedia.com/terms/l/liability.asp

Outside of accounting and finance this term simply refers to any money or service that is currently owed to another party. One form of liability, for example, would be the property taxes that a homeowner owes to the municipal government.

Current liabilities are debts payable within one year, while long-term liabilities are debts payable over a longer period.

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Note added at 1 hr (2013-09-08 21:05:08 GMT)
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outstanding= not settled or resolved or unpaid
Selected response from:

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 02:43
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +6any liabilities (which are still) owed by the company
Yvonne Gallagher
5claims against the company
Charlesp


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
any liabilities (which are still) owed by the company


Explanation:
so A

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2013-09-08 21:03:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Definition of 'Liability'
A company's legal debts or obligations that arise during the course of business operations. Liabilities are settled over time through the transfer of economic benefits including money, goods or services.
Investopedia Says
Investopedia explains 'Liability'
Recorded on the balance sheet (right side), liabilities include loans, accounts payable, mortgages, deferred revenues and accrued expenses. Liabilities are a vital aspect of a company's operations because they are used to finance operations and pay for large expansions. They can also make transactions between businesses more efficient. For example, the outstanding money that a company owes to its suppliers would be considered a liability.
http://www.investopedia.com/terms/l/liability.asp

Outside of accounting and finance this term simply refers to any money or service that is currently owed to another party. One form of liability, for example, would be the property taxes that a homeowner owes to the municipal government.

Current liabilities are debts payable within one year, while long-term liabilities are debts payable over a longer period.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2013-09-08 21:05:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

outstanding= not settled or resolved or unpaid

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 02:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 115
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: "Against" is what clinches it; the other way round would be liabilities in the company's favour. / Sounds great; hope you had a good time.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Charles. In Canada last 2 weeks so was missing activity here!//Yep, wonderful! Lots of travel to visit old friends...

agree  Phong Le
4 hrs
  -> Many thanks Phong:-)

agree  maelstrom143 (X)
4 hrs
  -> Many thanks Maelstrom143:-)

agree  Anna Herbst: ...and agree with Charles
6 hrs
  -> Many thanks again Anna:-)

agree  Łukasz Gos-Furmankiewicz
14 hrs
  -> many thanks Lukasz:-)

agree  Charlesp
6 days
  -> many thanks!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
claims against the company


Explanation:
simple as that.

Charlesp
Sweden
Local time: 03:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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