failing his or her legal guardian(s)

English translation: requires punctuation to make it more understandable

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:failing his or her legal guardian(s)
English translation:requires punctuation to make it more understandable

10:12 Oct 7, 2018
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2018-10-10 14:54:07 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / Terms & Conditions
English term or phrase: failing his or her legal guardian(s)
In the event that the Competitor is a minor, he/she shall be deemed to have been authorized by his/her parents or by the persons(s) having parental authority over him or her, or that failing his or her legal guardian(s), to enter the Competition.
Muhammad Said
Egypt
requires punctuation to make it more understandable
Explanation:
...having parental authority over him or her, or, that failing, his or her legal guardian(s), to enter the Competition.

"Failing that" would be a better word order. If the parents or those with paternal authority are not available or do not exist, a legal guardian will do.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:58
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6requires punctuation to make it more understandable
Jack Doughty
5 +3that failing, his or her legal guardian(s) [see comment]
Jennifer Caisley


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
that failing, his or her legal guardian(s) [see comment]


Explanation:
There is a comma missing/implied in the text - "that failing, his or her legal guardians".

This means that, if the competitor's parents cannot/do not give their consent, his/her legal guardians can do so in their stead, in line with the authority they would usually be permitted to exercise.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_guardian for information on this.

Jennifer Caisley
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:58
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: I really appreciate it.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: As Jack says, it's usually "failing that".
38 mins
  -> Yes, exactly (I think Jack posted his response while I was in the process of drafting mine - he expresses it much clearer!)

agree  Martin Riordan: Two missing commas? Before and after "that failing"...
14 hrs
  -> I agree - two commas would make it even clearer, but I think the comma preceding "that failing" would be stylistically advisable rather than a grammatical necessity, unlike the second one!

agree  acetran
2 days 8 hrs
  -> Thank you!
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
requires punctuation to make it more understandable


Explanation:
...having parental authority over him or her, or, that failing, his or her legal guardian(s), to enter the Competition.

"Failing that" would be a better word order. If the parents or those with paternal authority are not available or do not exist, a legal guardian will do.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:58
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 239
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: I really appreciate it.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch: Punctuation would be a good idea, but a reader who knows how to parse English is even more important. It's acceptable, modern practice to omit the comma after "him or her" in order to avoid a comma overload.
50 mins
  -> Thank you. I would rather "overload" a sentence with commas than leave it difficult to understand.

agree  Yvonne Gallagher
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Martin Riordan: Yes, better too many than too few!
14 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Daryo
1 day 1 hr
  -> Тhank you.

agree  Tina Vonhof: The more commas, the merrier.
1 day 6 hrs
  -> Thank you. But in general, fewer are used in US English than in UK English.

agree  Yorkshireman: With you on that, Tina.
1 day 6 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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