make out allegations

English translation: substantiate allegations (support them with evidence, though not necessarily prove them)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:make out allegations
Selected answer:substantiate allegations (support them with evidence, though not necessarily prove them)
Entered by: Charles Davis

07:41 Feb 13, 2019
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
English term or phrase: make out allegations
"Further in light of the above findings I find all of the allegations in 18 a)- d)
above made out."


What does "made out" mean in this context?
Mohammad Ghaffari
Local time: 20:21
substantiate allegations (support them with evidence, though not necessarily prove them)
Explanation:
"Make out" here means more than "state" but something less than "prove". It means that the allegations have been supported or substantiated, so that there is a prima facie case to be answered: at first sight, there is reason to believe that the allegations are true. In a criminal context, to make out a case against someone means to present sufficient grounds to justify charging that person with an offence and calling upon the person to defend him/herself against the charge. The case has not yet been proven and the accused person may be able to rebut it. The expression is used in non-legal contexts too.

"6 make out a case (for something)
to find good reasons that prove something or show why you need something"
https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/make-out

"in order to interview him, we would have to have had reasonable grounds to suspect that an [offence] had been committed. The investigation had shown that while an allegation had been made, the offence had not been made out in law and as such those reasonable grounds had ceased"
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/feb/15/report...
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 17:21
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +1substantiate allegations (support them with evidence, though not necessarily prove them)
Charles Davis
4Write down/complete/represent
Sina Salehi
3 +1see my suggestions
Yvonne Gallagher
3they are false allegation. What they affirm is not true.
Adela Perez del Viso
3proven
AllegroTrans


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Write down/complete/represent


Explanation:
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.macmillandictionary.com/amp...
to write all the necessary information on a document such as a cheque.
to represent or delineate in detail: from Webster online
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/make out

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Note added at 27 mins (2019-02-13 08:09:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think "delinaeate" is the best one: to represent in detail.

Sina Salehi
Iran
Local time: 19:51
Native speaker of: Native in Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian)
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Well, this is the point. It doesn't give me an impression of "delineate/describe" in this context. I thought it might have a sense of "confirm" ('vaared budan' in Persian), but if it was not suggested by anyone, then I'd go with this "delineate" option. Thanks for your input :)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Victoria Britten: Impossible to be entirely sure without more context.
1 hr
  -> Yes. I am not entitely sure. High means 60 to 80 percent, not entirely.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
substantiate allegations (support them with evidence, though not necessarily prove them)


Explanation:
"Make out" here means more than "state" but something less than "prove". It means that the allegations have been supported or substantiated, so that there is a prima facie case to be answered: at first sight, there is reason to believe that the allegations are true. In a criminal context, to make out a case against someone means to present sufficient grounds to justify charging that person with an offence and calling upon the person to defend him/herself against the charge. The case has not yet been proven and the accused person may be able to rebut it. The expression is used in non-legal contexts too.

"6 make out a case (for something)
to find good reasons that prove something or show why you need something"
https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/make-out

"in order to interview him, we would have to have had reasonable grounds to suspect that an [offence] had been committed. The investigation had shown that while an allegation had been made, the offence had not been made out in law and as such those reasonable grounds had ceased"
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/feb/15/report...

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 17:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 136
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, Charles.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: oops, your answer wasn't there as I was drafting. We seem to have come to much the same conclusions but the asker needs to say how the draft judgement concludes.
7 mins
  -> Thanks, Yvonne :-) To me, "in light of the above findings, I find..." makes it clear that the writer, who must be a judge, has concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the allegations. "Alleged" or "reported" would be a tautology here.

agree  Tina Vonhof
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, Tina! Sorry I forgot to say so at the time :-)

neutral  Robert Carter: Interesting. I'm not familiar with the term, but it appears to be similar in meaning to the phrase "actualizarse el tipo" in Spanish.
29 days
  -> Thanks, Robert. I must confess I'm not familiar with that term!
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
see my suggestions


Explanation:
As Victoria has said, there is far too little context here.

You say that allegations have been made in court, i.e someone (the plaintiff) has alleged that something has occurred/taken place or been done. (but you've given no details)

Now a draft judgement is saying that these allegations have been "made out". It seems like an odd choice of words without more context. You don't proceed to tell us what CONCLUSION this judgment reaches? In other words, does it find the plaintiff's allegations are founded, that there are grounds for these allegations? This would mean that

"made out"= substantiated (founded/accepted as true)

So, this "made out" could mean that the aforesaid allegations have been accepted as substantiated because enough evidence has been produced to support them

"made out" can mean other things too, including alleged/reported/completed/implied etc. but I think the most likely meaning/synonym here is "substantiated" or "accepted as true"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2019-02-13 15:37:48 GMT)
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OK then made out means founded or substantiated for sure

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2019-02-13 15:39:24 GMT)
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OK then "made out" means "founded" or "substantiated" for sure, i.e. there are grounds for these allegations

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 16:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 115
Notes to answerer
Asker: In the conclusion section, allegations are founded. Thank you very much, Yvonne.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tina Vonhof
4 hrs
  -> Many thanks:-)
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
proven


Explanation:
As others have said, more context would help, but the text sounds to me like part of the decision of a court/tribunal/etc.


AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 19
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2 days 12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
they are false allegation. What they affirm is not true.


Explanation:
It is legal English. The allegations (affirmations made by one party) are built up from false premises

Adela Perez del Viso
Argentina
Local time: 13:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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