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breaking and entering

English translation: burglary

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17:08 Mar 13, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
English term or phrase: breaking and entering
Hello All,

"breaking and entering" has been tagged as "old-fashioned" in Oxford Dictionary. Do you happen to know what has recently replaced this term?

Many thanks
Mehmet Hascan
Ireland
Local time: 18:33
English translation:burglary
Explanation:
You are probably thinking of burglary


burglary

Crime of breaking into and entering a structure with the intent to commit a felony within (see felony and misdemeanour). It is one of several crimes in the general category of theft. Some state statutes specify degrees of burglary based on when and where the crime occurs, whether anyone is present in the structure when it is broken into, and whether a deadly weapon is used.


Selected response from:

David Cahill
Local time: 19:33
Grading comment
thank you all very much.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7I think it it still very much used, but here is a dissection of meaning:
Ioanna Karamanou
5 +3burglary
David Cahill
4unlawful entry
Buck


Discussion entries: 11





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
burglary


Explanation:
You are probably thinking of burglary


burglary

Crime of breaking into and entering a structure with the intent to commit a felony within (see felony and misdemeanour). It is one of several crimes in the general category of theft. Some state statutes specify degrees of burglary based on when and where the crime occurs, whether anyone is present in the structure when it is broken into, and whether a deadly weapon is used.




David Cahill
Local time: 19:33
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
thank you all very much.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jonathan MacKerron
6 mins
  -> thanks, jonathan

neutral  kipruss3: if this is american english, burglary is less common than B&E in everyday or legal use
2 hrs
  -> It's UK English

neutral  Alexander Demyanov: B&E doesn't have to involve "intent to commit a felony", which burglary does
5 hrs

agree  Pham Huu Phuoc: very good
20 hrs
  -> thanks, pham

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
1 day1 hr
  -> thanks, marju
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
I think it it still very much used, but here is a dissection of meaning:


Explanation:
burglary vs. tresspassing

http://dictionary.law.com/default2.asp?selected=98&bold=

breaking and entering
n. 1) the criminal act of entering a residence or other enclosed property through the slightest amount of force (even pushing open a door), without authorization. If there is intent to commit a crime, this is burglary. If there is no such intent, the breaking and entering alone is probably at least illegal trespass, which is a misdemeanor crime. 2) the criminal charge for the above.
See also: burglary trespass

Ioanna Karamanou
United States
Local time: 13:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl: still very much used Results 1 - 10 of about 1,880,000 for "breaking and entering ".
4 mins

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: definitely a legal distinction
4 mins

agree  R-i-c-h-a-r-d
1 hr

agree  Can Altinbay: It's used here in the US all the time.
2 hrs

agree  Sophia Finos
3 hrs

agree  Alexander Demyanov
5 hrs

agree  ugrankar
8 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
unlawful entry


Explanation:
In the end, I suppose it depends on the context in which the term is used. Just a suggestion.

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Note added at 16 hrs (2007-03-14 09:54:23 GMT)
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More information would be useful.

Buck
Netherlands
Local time: 19:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
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Changes made by editors
Mar 13, 2007 - Changes made by Kim Metzger:
FieldOther » Law/Patents


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