KudoZ home » English » Law (general)

Temporary Occupancy By Law

English translation: See comment below...

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
17:00 Feb 17, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Law (general)
English term or phrase: Temporary Occupancy By Law
Last week I asked for help with this term. The customer is not happy with the term and says it should be "By-Law Temporary occupancy".

Could somebody help me out?

Thank you.
Felicite Robertson
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:17
English translation:See comment below...
Explanation:
Well, I don't know why they don't like it, as far as I am concerned 'temporary occupancy' is an adjective that describes what type of 'by-law' it is, so the word order is correct in English.

The suggested reversal of the word order makes it sound more like French, but only really works in English if you imagine it with punctuation, like:
'By-law: temporary occupancy' etc., or an added word, like:
'By-law for temporary occupancy'

Otherwise, it could even be ambiguous; in English, it makes it sound as if 'by-law' is an adjective describing the 'temporary occupation', which I presume is definitely NOT the case.

So I really can't understand what your client doesn't like about it...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2005-02-22 12:26:20 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Alaa has made a very important point there: I failed to pick you up on the omitted hyphen in your rejected wording as written in your question here, as I assumed it was just a slip of the fingers. But of course, the presence of this hyphen is VITAl for correct redaing of your phrase, and if you did leave it out in your text, I can see why the client rejected it!

As Alaa says, either being careful to retain the hyphen or re-formulating the phrase is essential to avoid even worse ambiguity!

In my dusty, old-fashioned way, this is one of the reasons why I favour the UK spelling of bye-law, because at least this avoids any possibility of ambiguity...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:17
Grading comment
Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +3See comment below...
Tony M
3 +1Where is the hyphen?
Alaa Zeineldine


  

Answers


1 day20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
temporary occupancy by law
Where is the hyphen?


Explanation:
Did you miss out the hyphen in by-law? If you did, the phrase "temporary occupancy by law" could be interpreted also as "temporary occupancy required by law".

You can avoid the ambuiguity using Dusty's suggested "By-law for temporary occupancy", or if you have some flexbility, use "Temporary Occupancy Rules", or some other appropriate synonym such as regulations, etc.

Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 11:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Good point! I failed to pick up on the fact that Asker's question omitted the hyphen, but of course it is ALL-IMPORTANT in this phrase!
2 days23 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
See comment below...


Explanation:
Well, I don't know why they don't like it, as far as I am concerned 'temporary occupancy' is an adjective that describes what type of 'by-law' it is, so the word order is correct in English.

The suggested reversal of the word order makes it sound more like French, but only really works in English if you imagine it with punctuation, like:
'By-law: temporary occupancy' etc., or an added word, like:
'By-law for temporary occupancy'

Otherwise, it could even be ambiguous; in English, it makes it sound as if 'by-law' is an adjective describing the 'temporary occupation', which I presume is definitely NOT the case.

So I really can't understand what your client doesn't like about it...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2005-02-22 12:26:20 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Alaa has made a very important point there: I failed to pick you up on the omitted hyphen in your rejected wording as written in your question here, as I assumed it was just a slip of the fingers. But of course, the presence of this hyphen is VITAl for correct redaing of your phrase, and if you did leave it out in your text, I can see why the client rejected it!

As Alaa says, either being careful to retain the hyphen or re-formulating the phrase is essential to avoid even worse ambiguity!

In my dusty, old-fashioned way, this is one of the reasons why I favour the UK spelling of bye-law, because at least this avoids any possibility of ambiguity...

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 80
Grading comment
Thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  juvera: Or if you insert the number; By-law XY.z Temporary occupancy.
33 mins
  -> Indeed! Thanks, Juvera!

agree  Patrice: one of the few cases where we can say the customer is wrong?
53 mins
  -> Thanks, Patricia! Well, maybe they know something we don't... All depends exactly what the reason for their objection is

agree  Ghyslaine LE NAGARD
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, NewCal!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search