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use of 'irrespective'

English translation: Not necessarily with alternative or "whether"

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19:01 May 12, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
English term or phrase: use of 'irrespective'
Is the use of this expression, always with the alternative:

e.g.

irrespective of whether she is rich or poor

OR irrespective of whether she is rich

Is this right or wrong, then?

...irrespective of whether these are held or not in common.......
xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 15:07
English translation:Not necessarily with alternative or "whether"
Explanation:
Either of your first two examples is acceptable. You can also use it without "whether", e.g. "irrespective of her financial situation..."

The word order of your third example is incorrect: should be either
"irrespective of whether or not these are held in common" or
"irrespective of whether these are held in common or not".
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:07
Grading comment
Thanks for 3 great explanations, but i choose this as first.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5Not necessarily with alternative or "whether"
Jack Doughty
4 +3The phrase "irrespective of" is to be followed by a noun.Fuad Yahya
5 +1Another way of putting it
Christina Clark


  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Not necessarily with alternative or "whether"


Explanation:
Either of your first two examples is acceptable. You can also use it without "whether", e.g. "irrespective of her financial situation..."

The word order of your third example is incorrect: should be either
"irrespective of whether or not these are held in common" or
"irrespective of whether these are held in common or not".

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4126
Grading comment
Thanks for 3 great explanations, but i choose this as first.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lesley Clayton
6 mins

agree  xxxjerryk
24 mins

agree  Jan Liebelt
1 hr

agree  Betty Revelioti
1 hr

agree  Сергей Лузан
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Another way of putting it


Explanation:
The adverb 'irrespective' doesn't carry any particular grammatical rule, I think it's 'whether' that's got you.

This is how I would put it:

'Irrespective of whether or not these are held in common' or 'irrespective of whether these are held in common'.





Christina Clark
Denmark
Local time: 15:07
Native speaker of: Danish
PRO pts in pair: 9

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Сергей Лузан
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
The phrase "irrespective of" is to be followed by a noun.


Explanation:
The noun may be a single word or a simple phrase, like "irrespective of the weather," or "irrespective of consequences," or the noun may be something more complex, like "whether it snows or not," or "whether or not she returns the favor." So long as "irrespective of" is followed by a noun or a noun phrase, you are fine.

Fuad

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 893

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Kinory
14 mins

agree  Jan Liebelt
35 mins

agree  Сергей Лузан
9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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