cl or cl.

English translation: cl (without period)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:cl or cl.
English translation:cl (without period)
Entered by: Charlesp

08:53 Apr 18, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: cl or cl.
Is "cl" written cl or cl. (ie with a period), in English, and is there a difference between British English and American English?
Charlesp
Sweden
Local time: 10:11
cl
Explanation:
without a period / full stop

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Note added at 5 mins (2005-04-18 08:58:59 GMT)
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No difference between US and British English as far as I know.

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Note added at 11 mins (2005-04-18 09:05:14 GMT)
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According to some US websites, it seems it can also be either cl or cL - I\'ve never seen this second usage in British English though. See for example:
Centilitre - definition of Centilitre in Encyclopedia. A centilitre (cL or cl) a metric unit of volume that is equal to one hundredth of a litre and is equal to a little more than six tenths (0.6102) of acubic ...
encyclopedia.laborlawtalk.com/Centilitre - 15k - 16 Apr 2005 -
Selected response from:

egunn
Local time: 09:11
Grading comment
Thanks everyone. Now it is clear. Great.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +9cl
egunn


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
cl


Explanation:
without a period / full stop

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2005-04-18 08:58:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

No difference between US and British English as far as I know.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2005-04-18 09:05:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

According to some US websites, it seems it can also be either cl or cL - I\'ve never seen this second usage in British English though. See for example:
Centilitre - definition of Centilitre in Encyclopedia. A centilitre (cL or cl) a metric unit of volume that is equal to one hundredth of a litre and is equal to a little more than six tenths (0.6102) of acubic ...
encyclopedia.laborlawtalk.com/Centilitre - 15k - 16 Apr 2005 -

egunn
Local time: 09:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks everyone. Now it is clear. Great.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mools: I find multiplying by 10 to get ml can often be tidier: e.g. 0.5 cl = 5 ml (and this site is handy - http://www.metric-conversions.org)
7 mins

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: if it's centilitre, then without the full stop/period
10 mins

agree  Tony M: Standard SI units ought never to be used with a period. I agree with Moles: preferred sub/multiples are +/-10^3; capital L is deprecated, but sometimes used to avoid confusion with figure 1; correct use of leading space avoids prob., or write litre
17 mins

agree  Ken Cox: Further to Mools, cl is used much less often than ml in North America, at least in non-scientific literature
19 mins

agree  Arcoiris: also with all the above comments
39 mins

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
1 hr

agree  Robert Donahue (X)
4 hrs

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
5 hrs

agree  Alp Berker
12 hrs
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