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arisen

English translation: questions which/that have arisen (or which arose)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase: grammar: questions arisen
English translation:questions which/that have arisen (or which arose)
Entered by: RHELLER

00:25 Apr 29, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: arisen
Please kindly answer my questions that has arisen from reading

Question: Can I just say "...questions arisen from..."?

TIA!!!
Jianming Sun
Local time: 21:02
my questions which have arisen from
Explanation:
or you can say which arose from

no, you cannot use arisen alone
it is to be used with a "helping" or "auxiliary" verb

has gone, has eaten, has taken

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Note added at 6 mins (2005-04-29 00:31:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/grammar/tenses.html

for grammar examples

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Note added at 3 hrs 1 min (2005-04-29 03:27:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

participles as adjectives.
Many participles can also function as adjectives: an interesting experience, an interested customer; the surprising results, the surprised researchers. But it is often hard to tell when a participle is an adjective, especially with past participles. Linguists have a number of tests for confirming an adjective. Here are four of them:
Can the word be used attributively (i.e., before the noun it modifies), as in an intriguing offer.
Can it be used in the predicate, especially after the verb seem, as in She thought the party boring and He seems concerned about you.
Can it be compared, as in We are even more encouraged now and The results are most encouraging.
Can it be modified by very, as in They are very worried about this.
5
Some adjectives pass more of these tests than others and are thus more purely adjectival. Disastrous, for instance, passes tests 1, 2, and 3, but not 4. When used as adjectives, most participles pass all four tests, but modification by very is tricky.
You can tell that a past participle is really part of a passive verb—and not an adjective—when it is followed by a by prepositional phrase that has a personal agent as its object. Thus, the participle married would be part of the verb in the sentence Chuck and Wendy were married by a bishop but used as an adjective in the sentence Chuck and Wendy were happily married for about six months. To confirm the adjectival status of a participle, try transforming the sentence to see if the participle can come before the noun: For about six months Chuck and Wendy were a happily married couple.

http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/047.html
Selected response from:

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 07:02
Grading comment
Thank you all for help! I appreciate good rewordings greatly! I 've learned things here. :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7my questions which have arisen from
RHELLER
4 +3see explanation
Can Altinbay
5 +1arose from or try "emanate from/ flow out from "
Rina LS
3 +2after
Derek Gill Franßen
3 +2questions that arose from reading
Gabo Pena
3arising + that versus which
Charlie Bavington (X)


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
questions that arose from reading


Explanation:
/



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-04-29 00:29:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

arisen by

Gabo Pena
Local time: 06:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rina LS: but there is no need to use "that", just arose from
34 mins
  -> true, thanx!

agree  rangepost
43 mins
  -> thnx!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
see explanation


Explanation:
How about something like "I have read your ... and have some questions, which I hope you can answer."


Can Altinbay
Local time: 09:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rina LS: yes, Can,we should try not to complicate things
14 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Gabo Pena: agree with Rina, simple is masterful...
27 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Robert Donahue (X)
43 mins
  -> Thank you.
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
arose from or try "emanate from/ flow out from "


Explanation:
It is not acceptable to use the verb in singular "has arisen", but in plural "have arisen", but in my opinion it is better to use The Simple Past Tense (if the action is finished)= arose from.
... Questions arose from...or Questions emanated from... Due to lack of context I cannot say wether you could use just "arisen from", but it is acceptable to use arisen as an adjective followed by from. Further there is no need to use "that or which", just "Questions arose from".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 34 mins (2005-04-29 00:59:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just take a look at this example:A slight unpleasantness arose from this discussion.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 36 mins (2005-04-29 01:02:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You may try arasing from also if new questions still occurs: Questions arising from... Refer to example:Injuries arising from defective products.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 20 mins (2005-04-29 01:45:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

See the standard terms where \"arisen\" is used as an adjective: debt arisen before the bankruptcy was opene;fully-arisen sea.. It is obvious that arisen fromcan be used as an adjective: Questions arisen from reading, made me some troubles. LOL

Rina LS
Serbia
Local time: 15:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in Serbo-CroatSerbo-Croat

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gabo Pena: excellent!
1 hr
  -> thanks dear colleague

neutral  RHELLER: questions...made me some troubles??? that is not English;DON'T misquote me. Read the phrase again.
1 hr
  -> What? Using the past participle as an adjective is not English? Very strange!

neutral  Charlie Bavington (X): you can't use arisen willy-nilly like that as adjective unless it's for the subject. And while not grammatically wrong, native English speakers just don't say "made me some troubles" - at the very least it should be "caused".
1 hr
  -> As you can see I used it as an adjective for the subject, and also it can be used for the object...For the verb: make troubles see the English Idioms, 2. edition and you will see that is the English phrase and means just as you said "caused..."
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41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
arising + that versus which


Explanation:
I quite like "..my questions arsing from reading".

That vs which, taken from some notes I got on the subject from somewhere...

'Which' informs, 'that' defines.
'This is the house that Jack built.' But 'This house, which Jack built, is now falling down.'

"that" is used in identifying/defining relative clauses (those that tell us which person or thing is meant), and "which" in nonidetifying (those that tell us more about whatever), i.e they inform

--The Economist Style Guide, 1991<<

>>If you *can* replace a "which" by a "that" without it grating on the ear, you should.<<

>> another clue is that identifying clauses (those using that) are not separated by commas <<
(and by extension, if it needs commas, it's a which, as Word will tell you!)

>> Another clue is that if you can miss out the relative pronoun without changing the meaning, it's a defining clause (i.e you could put that) <<

Fowler points out that people tend to write "which" more often than they say it, and as a result "which" is considered by some to be more correct or literary.

Overall, I'd be inclined to use "that" here, as you already have, although it would be hard to argue that "which" is actually wrong.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 14 mins (2005-04-29 02:39:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

whoops, unfortunate typo - not \"arsing\" (!) but arising, of course :-)

Charlie Bavington (X)
Local time: 14:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Gabo Pena: i.m confussed and diffused...
51 mins
  -> What about, old stick? :-) If I can shed any light, let me know....
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
my questions which have arisen from


Explanation:
or you can say which arose from

no, you cannot use arisen alone
it is to be used with a "helping" or "auxiliary" verb

has gone, has eaten, has taken

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2005-04-29 00:31:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/grammar/tenses.html

for grammar examples

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 1 min (2005-04-29 03:27:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

participles as adjectives.
Many participles can also function as adjectives: an interesting experience, an interested customer; the surprising results, the surprised researchers. But it is often hard to tell when a participle is an adjective, especially with past participles. Linguists have a number of tests for confirming an adjective. Here are four of them:
Can the word be used attributively (i.e., before the noun it modifies), as in an intriguing offer.
Can it be used in the predicate, especially after the verb seem, as in She thought the party boring and He seems concerned about you.
Can it be compared, as in We are even more encouraged now and The results are most encouraging.
Can it be modified by very, as in They are very worried about this.
5
Some adjectives pass more of these tests than others and are thus more purely adjectival. Disastrous, for instance, passes tests 1, 2, and 3, but not 4. When used as adjectives, most participles pass all four tests, but modification by very is tricky.
You can tell that a past participle is really part of a passive verb—and not an adjective—when it is followed by a by prepositional phrase that has a personal agent as its object. Thus, the participle married would be part of the verb in the sentence Chuck and Wendy were married by a bishop but used as an adjective in the sentence Chuck and Wendy were happily married for about six months. To confirm the adjectival status of a participle, try transforming the sentence to see if the participle can come before the noun: For about six months Chuck and Wendy were a happily married couple.

http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/047.html


RHELLER
United States
Local time: 07:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 59
Grading comment
Thank you all for help! I appreciate good rewordings greatly! I 've learned things here. :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter
8 mins
  -> thanks Will :-)

agree  Refugio
21 mins
  -> thanks Ruth :-)

agree  Robert Donahue (X): Actually I'd drop either "kindly" or "please" from this sentence too. Way too floral.
22 mins
  -> you are SO right :-)

agree  Charlie Bavington (X): my questions THAT have arisen (I'll post a justification separately :-) )
33 mins
  -> ah yes, the UK vs the US again

disagree  Rina LS: see my notes: arisen from can be used as an adjective
1 hr
  -> kudoz rules: you must show justification (i.e. references) to backup disagrees

agree  humbird
2 hrs
  -> thanks Humbird :-)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
8 hrs
  -> thanks Vicky!

agree  Pawel Gromek
20 hrs
  -> thanks Pawel!

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
2 days 9 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
after


Explanation:
You might considering rewording it a bit: "Would you please (be so kind and) answer the questions I have after reading the notes...".

Just as a side note: In your added context, you say it goes on to read "...the notes for...". That would, of course, be correct if this is about music, but otherwise "notes" is usually used together with "on".

:-)

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Note added at 8 hrs 52 mins (2005-04-29 09:18:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course, if you do formulate it this way, it needs to end with a question mark. ;-)

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 15:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger: Good way to phrase it.
3 hrs

agree  Robert Donahue (X): Would you please be so kind as to answer these questions I have after reading...".
5 hrs
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