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Cohesive words

English translation: idioms, collocation

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Cohesive words
English translation:idioms, collocation
Entered by: Balasubramaniam L.
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02:02 May 16, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: Cohesive words
I would like to know what does it call when two words are united? Eg. As such, hand to hand, ever since, etc
Where can i get all sorts of the unite words?
tq
baby
idioms, proverbs
Explanation:
Some of the examples you have given are "idioms".

Other set of words that are used just as they are, are called proverbs.

Eg., Jack of all trades, master of none.

It is usage that determines which words go with which, and I don't think there is any single term for it.

I don't know your purpose for finding this list, but if it is to learn English, then there are a number of good English usage books that you can refer to, which will list most of the idioms and common terms in addition to explaining their meaning and usage. One good one that I use is Fowler's "English Usage". Incidently, Fowler was one of the the first editors of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary.

Here is a web-site that has fairly large list of idioms, etc.

(If you find this web site useful, you should thank Rita Heller particularly, for it is taken from a posting she had made in one of the Proz forums)
Selected response from:

Balasubramaniam L.
India
Local time: 23:28
Grading comment
tq.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2phrase
Coral Getino
4 +1collocation/phrase
Kim Metzger
4Collocation ..reference
airmailrpl
4expressions or idiomsRHELLER
3idioms, proverbs
Balasubramaniam L.
3compound wordsxxxOso


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cohesive words
compound words


Explanation:
"Definition

In English, words, particularly adjectives and nouns, are combined into compound structures in a variety of ways. And once they are formed, they sometimes metamorphose over time. A common pattern is that two words — fire fly, say — will be joined by a hyphen for a time — fire-fly — and then be joined into one word — firefly. In this respect, a language like German, in which words are happily and immediately linked one to the other, might seem to have an advantage. There is only one sure way to know how to spell compounds in English: use an authoritative dictionary.

There are three forms of compound words:
the closed form, in which the words are melded together, such as firefly, secondhand, softball, childlike, crosstown, redhead, keyboard, makeup, notebook;

the hyphenated form, such as daughter-in-law, master-at-arms, over-the-counter, six-pack, six-year-old, mass-produced;

and the open form, such as post office, real estate, middle class, full moon, half sister, attorney general."

Good luck from Oso ¶:^)


    Reference: http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/compounds.htm
xxxOso
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
cohesive words
phrase


Explanation:
A phrase is a group of words that functions as a single unit in the syntax of a sentence.

For example the house at the end of the street (example 1) is a phrase. It acts like a noun. It contains the phrase at the end of the street (example 2), which acts like an adjective. Example 2 could be replaced by white, to make the phrase the white house. Examples 1 and 2 contain the phrase the end of the street (example 3) which acts like a noun. It could be replaced by the cross-roads to give the house at the cross-roads.

Each phrase has a word called its head which links it to the rest of the sentence. In English the head is often the first word of the phrase.

Phrases may be classified by the type of head they take

* Prepositional phrase with a preposition as head (e.g. in love, over the rainbow)
* Noun phrase with a noun as head (e.g. the black cat, a cat on the mat)
* Verb phrase with a verb as head (e.g. eat cheese, jump up and down)
* Adjectival phrase with an adjective as head (e.g. full of toys)
* Adverbial phrase with adverb as head (e.g. very carefully)

Formal definition

A phrase is a syntactic structure which has syntactic properties derived from its head.

For example the house at the end of the street is a noun phrase. Its head is house, and its syntactic properties come from that fact. It contains prepositional phrase at the end of the street, which acts as an adjunct. At the end of the street could be replaced by another adjunct, such as white, to make the phrase the white house. Of the street, another prepositional phrase, acts as a complement of end. Each phrase has a word called its head which gives it its syntactic properties.
Complexity

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Note added at 6 mins (2005-05-16 02:09:16 GMT)
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The examples you gave are adverbial phrases.

http://www.wordiq.com/definition/Phrase

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2005-05-16 02:10:37 GMT)
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Baby, a good dictionary, such as Oxford or Collins lists a lot of phrases.

Coral Getino
United States
Local time: 13:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio: set phrases
36 mins
  -> Gracias, Ruth!!!

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
3 days12 hrs
  -> Gracias Marju!!!
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
cohesive words
collocation/phrase


Explanation:
Maybe this is what you're looking for: "collocation - the way in which words are used together regularly. Collocation refers to the restrictions on how words can be used together, for example which prepositions are used with particular verbs, or which verbs and nouns are used together. For example, in English the verb 'perform' is used with 'operation' but not with 'discussion.'
The doctor performed the operation.


    Longman Dictionary of Language Teaching and Applied Linguistics
Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 187

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl: collocation
8 hrs
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cohesive words
idioms, proverbs


Explanation:
Some of the examples you have given are "idioms".

Other set of words that are used just as they are, are called proverbs.

Eg., Jack of all trades, master of none.

It is usage that determines which words go with which, and I don't think there is any single term for it.

I don't know your purpose for finding this list, but if it is to learn English, then there are a number of good English usage books that you can refer to, which will list most of the idioms and common terms in addition to explaining their meaning and usage. One good one that I use is Fowler's "English Usage". Incidently, Fowler was one of the the first editors of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary.

Here is a web-site that has fairly large list of idioms, etc.

(If you find this web site useful, you should thank Rita Heller particularly, for it is taken from a posting she had made in one of the Proz forums)


    Reference: http://www.learn-english-today.com/idioms/idioms_proverbs.ht...
Balasubramaniam L.
India
Local time: 23:28
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
tq.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  RHELLER: sorry, but proverb does not apply here
2 hrs
  -> Thanks for your opinion.
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cohesive words
expressions or idioms


Explanation:
hand-to-hand (hãnd'tə-hãnd') adj.
Being at close quarters: hand-to-hand combat.
hand to hand adv.
Idioms

1)In close combat; also, at close quarters. For example, If the enemy came any closer they would soon be fighting hand to hand. This expression, dating from about 1400, is usually restricted to military contexts but occasionally sees more general use.
from hand to hand. From one person to another; through a succession of persons. For example, The instructions were passed from hand to hand until everyone had seen them, or Over the generations the family albums went from hand to hand. [Mid-1500s]

2) from one person to another


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2005-05-16 02:12:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"ever since\" is not an idiom, it is an expression
\"I have loved bananas ever since I was a baby.\"
\"She is afraid of cars ever since the accident\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 mins (2005-05-16 02:16:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

actually, I think the 2nd sentence sounds odd... improvement:
\"She has been afraid of cars ever since the accident\"


    Reference: http://www.answers.com/library/Idioms-letter-1H
    www.learn-english-today.com/idioms/idioms_proverbs.h tml
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 11:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 59
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cohesive words
Collocation ..reference


Explanation:
Collocation is the relationship between two words or groups of words that often go together and form a common expression. If the expression is heard often, the words become 'glued' together in our minds. 'Crystal clear', 'middle management' 'nuclear family' and 'cosmetic surgery' are examples of collocated pairs of words. Some words are often found together because they make up a compound noun, for example 'riding boots' or 'motor cyclist'.
http://elc.polyu.edu.hk/advdicts/collocation.htm

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 14:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 32
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PRO (2): Balasubramaniam L., xxxOso


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Changes made by editors
May 16, 2005 - Changes made by Kim Metzger:
FieldOther » Art/Literary
May 16, 2005 - Changes made by Kim Metzger:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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