shine on / illuminate / light

English translation: shine on / illuminate

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22:29 Oct 22, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: shine on / illuminate / light
Dialogue: two people looking at the sun.
A: The sun that is shining on / illuminating / lighting us right now is the same that shone on / illuminated / lit Colón five hundred years ago.
B: you...
As a non-native speaker I think that the 3 possibilities are correct for this context. Am I right? Though I believe that there are some differences. Shine seems to be more idiomatic (natural)than the other two, and illuminate the most formal. I need to make a decision and need some native help.
Lakasa Stnorden
Local time: 23:32
English translation:shine on / illuminate
Explanation:
Two of your options work -- of which I personally would only ever use the first -- the second simply sounds stilted.

1. The sun that is shining on us right now is the same sun that shone on Colón five hundred years ago.

2. The sun that is illuminating us right now is the same sun that illuminated Colón five hundred years ago.
Selected response from:

Brie Vernier
Germany
Local time: 04:32
Grading comment
Many thanks to all of you!! Very interesting answers...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +14shine on / illuminate
Brie Vernier
5 +1see explanation for context
William Hawkins
4 +1shining
Charlesp
3 +1shining on
Michael Barnett
3that is shining / that was shining in Colon five hundred years ago
RHELLER


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +14
shine on / illuminate


Explanation:
Two of your options work -- of which I personally would only ever use the first -- the second simply sounds stilted.

1. The sun that is shining on us right now is the same sun that shone on Colón five hundred years ago.

2. The sun that is illuminating us right now is the same sun that illuminated Colón five hundred years ago.

Brie Vernier
Germany
Local time: 04:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Many thanks to all of you!! Very interesting answers...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Derek Gill Franßen: I agree that "shine on" is the best of the lot for this sentence, though "illuminate" could also work with spaces, such as fields or the interior of a car, for example (but not here). IMHO :-)
2 mins
  -> Thanks, Derek; "illuminate" seems to work best in the simple present rather than as a gerund

agree  KathyT: Yes, although 'illuminate' is not incorrect, "shine on" is definitely the preferred option, IMHO (-:
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Kathy

agree  Tsu Dho Nimh: "Shining on" means its rays are hitting you. You are standing in the sun. better choice
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Pseu

agree  Rachel Fell
9 mins
  -> Thanks, Rachel

agree  jennifer newsome
10 mins
  -> Thanks, Jennifer

agree  transparx
25 mins
  -> Thanks, Nino

agree  Charlesp
25 mins
  -> Thanks, Charles

agree  Elizabeth Lyons
33 mins
  -> Thanks, Elizabeth

agree  Dave Calderhead: Yes, except that the sun is also 500 years older and isn't exactly the same !:-{)>//No - it is just a litle older in its inevitable progression in millions of years time towards becoming a red dwarf or whatever.{)>
43 mins
  -> Thanks Dave -- so, you mean, we have a new sun now? ; )

agree  Balaban Cerit: yes, "shine on" is the best here
58 mins
  -> Thanks, Balaban

neutral  Refugio: Shine on, yes; illuminate, no
2 hrs
  -> As I noted above, Ruth, I wouldn't use it either, but it IS used ... e.g. http://www.wisdomworld.org/additional/christianity/ChurchAnd...

neutral  RHELLER: why say shine ON? "the sun that is shining right now"is sufficient
2 hrs
  -> Simply because we can. It creates a stronger link between the sun, the speaker and his/her audience

agree  Kurt Porter: I go to the beach so the sun can "shine on me." :) :) Why, Palma de Mallorca of course!
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Kurt ... and which beach would that be? And watch out for skin cancer!

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Saleh

agree  Will Matter: "shine on" is the most idiomatic and natural expression given this *particular* context.
19 hrs
  -> Thanks, Will

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
1 day 18 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marju
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35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
shining


Explanation:
The common espression would be "...shining on us..." (not in the sence of "shining on" somebody).

To use illuminating or lighting ..., well unless it is some particular effect you seek with dialogue, they shouldn't be used.

Charlesp
Sweden
Local time: 04:32
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 2

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio
1 hr
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56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
see explanation for context


Explanation:
The sun that is shining on us right now is the same that shone on / illuminated Colón five hundred years ago. "lighting us" is incorrect, a native speaker would never say this. You wouldn't use "illuminating us". Illumination in regards to people usually refers to the awakening of knowledge or the dispelling of illusion. Nor should you say "lit Colon" it sounds clunky. The other options are fine

William Hawkins
Local time: 04:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
shining on


Explanation:
I think there is another issue as well. The same sun that shone on Colon 500 years ago is still shining on us now. When you use the word "illuminate" my first inclination is to think of the sunlight itself. Clearly, the light from the sun which is illuminating me now, is not the same light that illuminated Colon 500 years ago. Perhaps this is just a personal bias.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 13 mins (2005-10-23 00:42:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

1. Sun A star that is the basis of the solar system and that sustains life on Earth, being the source of heat and light. It has a mean distance from Earth of about 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) a diameter of approximately 1,390,000 kilometers (864,000 miles) and a mass about 330,000 times that of Earth.
2. A star that is the center of a planetary system.
3. The radiant energy, especially heat and visible light, emitted by the sun; sunshine.
4. A sunlike object, representation, or design.

The scientific sounding word "illuminate" somehow connotes definition #3, which obviously would not make sense in the context of the question.


Michael Barnett
Local time: 22:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio
20 mins
  -> Thanks Ruth!
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
that is shining / that was shining in Colon five hundred years ago


Explanation:
is the same sun that was shining



RHELLER
United States
Local time: 20:32
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 59

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Brie Vernier: This won't work if "Colón" is a person, as in "Cristóbal"; the context doesn't indicate that it is, but you may want to consider the possibility nonetheless
9 hrs
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