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rush

English translation: rushed

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:rush
English translation:rushed
Entered by: Will Matter
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18:17 Oct 30, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: rush
a river of clear water that rushed along a bed of polished stones

I can't find a word to explain the way water would flow / move along in a mountain river
For those who speak Spanish the word in the original is "precipitarse"
Many thanks...
Lakasa Stnorden
Local time: 18:39
rushed
Explanation:
"Rushed" is OK in English in this context. One way to translate "precipitarse" is "rushed" so i'd say that your translation is OK.
Selected response from:

Will Matter
United States
Local time: 13:39
Grading comment
MANY THANKS!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6rushed
Will Matter
4 +1rush or...
Rachel Fell
4raced on
transparx
5 -1rushed down or along; cascaded down or along: flowed down or along
Jane Lamb-Ruiz
4cascaded
Michael Barnett
4flowed quickly
Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
flowed quickly


Explanation:
...

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Note added at 3 mins (2005-10-30 18:20:59 GMT)
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Usually means: with the force of the current behind it.

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 22:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 28
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
rushed


Explanation:
"Rushed" is OK in English in this context. One way to translate "precipitarse" is "rushed" so i'd say that your translation is OK.

Will Matter
United States
Local time: 13:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
MANY THANKS!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: yes sir :-)
12 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  NancyLynn
47 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Veronica Prpic Uhing
1 hr
  -> Thank you.

agree  Enza Longo
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Asghar Bhatti
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.

disagree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: no it isn't it has to be Rush down or rush over or rush something...you can't say rush the stone fo the river
2 hrs
  -> I think that the original sentence is fine as is, makes perfect sense to me.

agree  Saiwai Translation Services
7 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  airmailrpl: rushed along ON a bed of ..rushed along OVER a bed of
23 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cascaded


Explanation:
This may be the word you are looking for. It can be used for small waterfalls but also for water moving quickly downhill, with turbulence.

Michael Barnett
Local time: 16:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
rush or...


Explanation:
rushed along sounds fine; hurtled over or along, maybe; tumbled down (if it's down a hillside, for example)

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl: rushed along ON a bed of ..rushed along OVER a bed of
23 hrs
  -> Thank you airmailpl!
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
rushed down or along; cascaded down or along: flowed down or along


Explanation:
flowed down [down a mountain]

flowed along or rushed along [if the bed of the river is flat

what makes it specifically English is the Preposition

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 44 mins (2005-10-30 21:01:41 GMT)
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They Key Word is Down or Along or even By

the River's water rushed by over the polished stones on the riverbed

by over also

cheers



Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  transparx: restatement of answers already proposed ///please notice that the asker uses 'along' in two different ways; as a preposition, it is important in other languages as well in this context.
4 hrs
  -> no I was the Only One that pointed out that the Preposition Makes the Difference; that is the whole point in English, my friend....
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
raced on


Explanation:
another possibility

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 29 mins (2005-10-30 18:47:23 GMT)
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e.g.,
"Instinctively he lowered himself in the water, only raising his head to breathe from time to time, and Kaa came to anchor with a double twist of his tail round a sunken rock, holding Mowgli in the hollow of a coil, while the water raced on."
Rudyard Kipling, "The Jungle Book," p. 287


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 34 mins (2005-10-30 18:52:09 GMT)
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sorry, "The Jungle Books"!
Oxford University Press. 1992.

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Note added at 6 hrs 56 mins (2005-10-31 01:13:44 GMT)
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"His exultant army, fat with spoils, *raced on down* to the Ancayaco (Eagle Water) crossing on the approaches to the Huamanga (Ayacucho) Basin, where Mayca Yupanqui's shattered forces stood on the hither side of the river.
in "Empire of the Inca" by Burr Cartwright Brundage.
This simply tells you, Jane, that "raced on" can be followed by a prepositional phrase, obviously. I'm using "on" adverbially; "along" or "down" could be a possible preposition here.
In a way it would be like the following:
"It was a horrible thing -- and it grew upon him. In a blind, mechanical way, his brain receptive to nothing else, Jimmie Dale *walked on along* the street." ("The Adventures of Jimmy Dale" by Frank L. Packard).
Of course, you may argue that "water" is semantically different from people; but, in fact, "water," just like "fire" and other such things, is often considered to be animate rather than inanimate. You should know this since it is beautifully reflected in the syntax of Spanish (but not English, or even Italian).

I personally suspect that you disagree just to disagree.
Several people answered and, as far as I can see (but perhaps I fail to see something you do), none of them suggested replacing "rushed along" with "rushed/cascaded/flowed quickly/raced on," and this for two reasons, I believe. The first is that the question involved "rushed," not "rushed along," as you can still easily check by simply scrolling up the screen. The second, and more important, reason is that I believe every one of the answerers is fully aware that in this context the preposition cannot be dispensed with. Instead, you come more than two hours later, sprinkle a few disagrees, and basically propose three terms that had already been proposed.
Of course, you may like one term and dislike another; this is natural. I don't mind if, for instance, you think "raced" is not appropriate. Perhaps others share your sensitivity, and that's fine. But "rushed/cascaded/flowed" had already been proposed; this should be somehow pointed out.

When I read "precipitarse," I immediately thought of "raced," I don't know why. I checked to see if it was possible at all, and I found a few references. However, I'm not adding this to convince anyone that my answer is the best; in fact, I wouldn't mind changing it to a not-for-point one, if this helps.



transparx
United States
Local time: 16:39
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: no raced Along..or raced Down..To race on in your example means Continues to go and cannot be used in the sentence given. It is unidiomatic and incorrect.
2 hrs
  -> see my added note. /// you're right: "idio-" is the key. idioms are quick sands. perhaps you should read my paper on this.

agree  Cristina Chaplin
16 hrs
  -> thank you awana!
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