KudoZ home » English » Linguistics

Functional words

English translation: content words & function words

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
10:33 Jul 4, 2007
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: Functional words
Linguistically what name is given to words like "just" (when used in the way it's used in the examples)? ie when it's not a "content word".

Is it "functional"?

"Just listen to me"; "Just help yourself" (ie. used in orders to get sb's attention, to make a statement or order stronger)
duchess
Local time: 11:56
English translation:content words & function words
Explanation:
I understand that, in your example, “just” is an adverb, synonym with ‘only’ and ‘merely’; and adverbs are classified as *content words*, not as *function words*, as you can see in the following references, as well as at the link provided by Peter.

Hope this will of some help,
Manuel
==========

just
adverb.
1. and nothing more; "I was merely asking"; "it is simply a matter of time"; "just a scratch"; "he was only a child"; "hopes that last but a moment" [syn: merely]
WordNet® 3.0, © 2006 by Princeton University.
<http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=just&r=66>
<http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/merely>
------

(…) For instance, Read (2001) describes the different considerations involved in measuring lexical richness. It is important to understand how a ”word‘ is defined. The first key distinction is between **”function‘ or ”grammatical‘ words such as and, a, to, and this (articles, prepositions, pronouns, conjunctions, auxiliaries etc)** and **”content‘ words such as nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs**. Taking the age old example:
<http://www.coe.int/T/DG4/Portfolio/documents/CEF ref supp Se...
-----

Content items are nouns, full lexical verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. Function items are determiners (articles and quantifiers), pronouns, prepositions, numerals, conjunctions, interjections, negative particles, and auxiliary and modal verbs.
(…)
Determiners (articles and quantifiers), prepositions, pronouns, numerals, conjunctions, interjections, existential “there”, the infinitival marker “to”, negative markers, auxiliary and modal verbs are referred to as “function words” (Sityaev, 2000:294).
<http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd/send-pdf.cgi?osu1117225383>)
--
<http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd/send-pdf.cgi?osu1117225383>
Selected response from:

Manuel Cedeño Berrueta
Local time: 05:56
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +2content words & function wordsManuel Cedeño Berrueta
5parts of speechMonika Silea


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
functional words
parts of speech


Explanation:
that's in traditional grammar

Monika Silea
Romania
Local time: 12:56
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
functional words
content words & function words


Explanation:
I understand that, in your example, “just” is an adverb, synonym with ‘only’ and ‘merely’; and adverbs are classified as *content words*, not as *function words*, as you can see in the following references, as well as at the link provided by Peter.

Hope this will of some help,
Manuel
==========

just
adverb.
1. and nothing more; "I was merely asking"; "it is simply a matter of time"; "just a scratch"; "he was only a child"; "hopes that last but a moment" [syn: merely]
WordNet® 3.0, © 2006 by Princeton University.
<http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=just&r=66>
<http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/merely>
------

(…) For instance, Read (2001) describes the different considerations involved in measuring lexical richness. It is important to understand how a ”word‘ is defined. The first key distinction is between **”function‘ or ”grammatical‘ words such as and, a, to, and this (articles, prepositions, pronouns, conjunctions, auxiliaries etc)** and **”content‘ words such as nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs**. Taking the age old example:
<http://www.coe.int/T/DG4/Portfolio/documents/CEF ref supp Se...
-----

Content items are nouns, full lexical verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. Function items are determiners (articles and quantifiers), pronouns, prepositions, numerals, conjunctions, interjections, negative particles, and auxiliary and modal verbs.
(…)
Determiners (articles and quantifiers), prepositions, pronouns, numerals, conjunctions, interjections, existential “there”, the infinitival marker “to”, negative markers, auxiliary and modal verbs are referred to as “function words” (Sityaev, 2000:294).
<http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd/send-pdf.cgi?osu1117225383>)
--
<http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd/send-pdf.cgi?osu1117225383>

Manuel Cedeño Berrueta
Local time: 05:56
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cervin
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Cervin!

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
5 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search