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where is predicate of the sentence?

English translation: no predicate contained

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:where is predicate of the sentence?
English translation:no predicate contained
Entered by: Gert Sass (M.A.)
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13:38 Jan 19, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / sentence analysis
English term or phrase: where is predicate of the sentence?
The sentence like this:" An appropriately comic and provincial fate for a man who half a century ago shook the dust of the provinces off his feet and sallied forth into the great world to practise la vie boheme."

I wonder how to analyze the sentence? And where is predicate of the sentence?

Thank you!
macky
Local time: 12:04
no predicate contained
Explanation:
The sentence does not contain a predicate. I would call this an enhanced apposition - i. e. it refers to sth/sb mentioned/described previously, as in
"Lucy, **my good old friend**, paid me a visit yesterday"
"Enhanced", because it isn't set apart by commas, but by periods/full stops due its length (among other factors of course)
Selected response from:

Gert Sass (M.A.)
Germany
Local time: 06:04
Grading comment
Thank you for help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6there is no predicatexxxTatiana N.
3 +7no predicate contained
Gert Sass (M.A.)


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
no predicate contained


Explanation:
The sentence does not contain a predicate. I would call this an enhanced apposition - i. e. it refers to sth/sb mentioned/described previously, as in
"Lucy, **my good old friend**, paid me a visit yesterday"
"Enhanced", because it isn't set apart by commas, but by periods/full stops due its length (among other factors of course)

Gert Sass (M.A.)
Germany
Local time: 06:04
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you for help!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Buck
1 hr

agree  Jim Tucker: yes, or you could call the entire sentence the predicate for an understood or previously mentioned subject: "(X was) an appropriately comic and provincial fate..."
2 hrs

agree  Michael Tovbin: with Jim
2 hrs

agree  JaneTranslates: This not actually a "sentence" but, rather, a "sentence fragment," and in formal writing, it is frowned upon. My composition teachers would have lowered my grade for this kind of writing!
3 hrs

agree  Susan Hammons
5 hrs

agree  Joyce A
12 hrs

neutral  Richard Benham: Actually, I think JT's analysis is better: the "sentence" doesn't lack a predicate, it *is* a predicate.
23 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
10 days
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
there is no predicate


Explanation:
your sentence has no predicate

The subject is "fate", everything after the word fate is an "in-built" attribute clause, or, in other words, a sentence that serves the function of an attribute for the subject "fate", but there is no predicate.

A predicate here would sound like:

... fate... is/was ... (and a component expressed by a verbal infinitive, a noun or a gerund)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2008-01-19 13:55:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

is it a sentence or only a part of the sentence?

Such sentences as yours are likely to appear at the end of a bigger sentence where the subject is defined (what was it that constituted the person's fate) in the first part, and a sentence like yours follows as a clause after a comma, then the whole clause will be simply an attribute and will not require any predicate.

Example:

He has ended up doing X, an appropriately comic ....

xxxTatiana N.
Local time: 00:04
Native speaker of: Russian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Gert Sass (M.A.): Oh sorry I was just typing my way through and thus didn't see yours
2 mins
  -> no problem :)

agree  Carol Gullidge
1 hr
  -> Thank you!

agree  JoshMcF: or it could come from a title, as well.
2 hrs
  -> Could be, too. Thank you!

agree  JaneTranslates: I agree. Please see my comment (and Jim's) on Gert's answer.
3 hrs
  -> That's exactly what I said, it can be just a part of the sentence. Thank you!

agree  Polangmar
6 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Joyce A
12 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Richard Benham: This is what I call a "Le Monde" construction, because that otherwise august publication had a predilection for it. Think of it as "This is/was an...", or as tacked onto the end of the previous sentence as an apposition.
13 hrs
  -> could be, too. Thank you!
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Changes made by editors
Jan 20, 2008 - Changes made by Gert Sass (M.A.):
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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