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genitive of actress

English translation: actress'

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:possessive form of "actress"
English translation:actress'
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
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17:02 Mar 5, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: genitive of actress
The dress of the actress.

The actress' dress? How many s's? Where to put the apostrophe?
Mina
the actress' role
Explanation:
For nouns ending in s (whether singular or plural), the possessive form requires only an apostrophe:

Unisys' annual report

Phyliss' comments

your boss' agenda

the actress' role
-----------------


NOTE: if a singular noun ending in s is followed by a word beginning with s, use only the apostrophe, not 's. Charles' shirt


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2004-03-05 17:13:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There is obviously more than one point of view on the topic :-)

Many writers consider it bad form to use apostrophe -s possessives with pieces of furniture and buildings or inanimate objects in general. Instead of \"the desk\'s edge\" (according to many authorities), we should write \"the edge of the desk\" and instead of \"the hotel\'s windows\" we should write \"the windows of the hotel.\" In fact, we would probably avoid the possessive altogether and use the noun as an attributive: \"the hotel windows.\" This rule (if, in fact, it is one) is no longer universally endorsed. We would not say \"the radio of that car\" instead of \"that car\'s radio\" (or the \"car radio\") and we would not write \"the desire of my heart\" instead of \"my heart\'s desire.\" Writing \"the edge of the ski\" would probably be an improvement over \"the ski\'s edge,\" however.

For expressions of time and measurement, the possessive is shown with an apostrophe -s: \"one dollar\'s worth,\" \"two dollars\' worth,\" \"a hard day\'s night,\" \"two years\' experience,\" \"an evening\'s entertainment.\"
Selected response from:

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 12:50
Grading comment
Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +16actress's
Kim Metzger
3 +3the actress' roleRHELLER
5 +1actress's dressFuad Yahya
3 +1actress's dressxxxIanW
5 -1actress' dress
humbird
4 -1actor'sLaurel Porter


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +16
actress's


Explanation:
For the plural it would be actresses'

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 13:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 187

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
0 min

agree  xxxIanW
1 min

agree  Hacene
1 min

agree  TransMark
1 min

agree  David Knowles
2 mins

agree  Pike
3 mins

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
5 mins

agree  Hermann
15 mins

agree  Attila Piróth
18 mins

agree  ben baudoin
1 hr

agree  Armorel Young
2 hrs

agree  karina koguta
3 hrs

agree  Jörgen Slet
4 hrs

agree  senin
19 hrs

agree  chopra_2002
20 hrs

agree  Scott Horne
4 days
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
actress's dress


Explanation:
Good question! I must admit that I am not 100% sure, but I would say "actress's dress".

xxxIanW
Local time: 20:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Scott Horne
4 days
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
actress's dress


Explanation:
The following is from William Strunk, Jr. (1869–1946). The Elements of Style. 1918.

http://www.bartleby.com/141/strunk.html#1

Form the possessive singular of nouns with 's.
Follow this rule whatever the final consonant. Thus write,

Charles's friend
Burns's poems
the witch's malice


This is the usage of the United States Government Printing Office and of the Oxford University Press.

Exceptions are the possessives of ancient proper names in -es and -is, the possessive Jesus', and such forms as for conscience' sake, for righteousness' sake. But such forms as Achilles' heel, Moses' laws, Isis' temple are commonly replaced by

the heel of Achilles
the laws of Moses
the temple of Isis


The pronominal possessives hers, its, theirs, yours, and oneself have no apostrophe.



    Reference: http://www.bartleby.com/141/strunk.html#1
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Scott Horne
4 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
the actress' role


Explanation:
For nouns ending in s (whether singular or plural), the possessive form requires only an apostrophe:

Unisys' annual report

Phyliss' comments

your boss' agenda

the actress' role
-----------------


NOTE: if a singular noun ending in s is followed by a word beginning with s, use only the apostrophe, not 's. Charles' shirt


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2004-03-05 17:13:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There is obviously more than one point of view on the topic :-)

Many writers consider it bad form to use apostrophe -s possessives with pieces of furniture and buildings or inanimate objects in general. Instead of \"the desk\'s edge\" (according to many authorities), we should write \"the edge of the desk\" and instead of \"the hotel\'s windows\" we should write \"the windows of the hotel.\" In fact, we would probably avoid the possessive altogether and use the noun as an attributive: \"the hotel windows.\" This rule (if, in fact, it is one) is no longer universally endorsed. We would not say \"the radio of that car\" instead of \"that car\'s radio\" (or the \"car radio\") and we would not write \"the desire of my heart\" instead of \"my heart\'s desire.\" Writing \"the edge of the ski\" would probably be an improvement over \"the ski\'s edge,\" however.

For expressions of time and measurement, the possessive is shown with an apostrophe -s: \"one dollar\'s worth,\" \"two dollars\' worth,\" \"a hard day\'s night,\" \"two years\' experience,\" \"an evening\'s entertainment.\"


    Reference: http://www.kanten.com/styleguide/book/possess.html
    Reference: http://www.stark.kent.edu/writing/apostrophes.htm
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 12:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 59
Grading comment
Thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  James Calder: Quite right Rita. You don't need to put an 's' after the apostrophe.
54 mins
  -> thanks James :-)

agree  Charlie Bavington: this is certainly what I was always taught. So mark this down as being Charles' opinion :-)
5 hrs
  -> dependable CB :-)

agree  Scott Horne: Both are possible, but _actress's_ is better
4 days
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
actor's


Explanation:
Easy fix: In the US today, writers prefer to use the gender-neutral(ized) "actor" in place of the old-fashioned and sexist-sounding "actress". Most of these "-ess" forms are being dropped nowadays.

If this doesn't work in your context, I agree with most of the other answerers that it should be "actress's".

Laurel Porter
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Scott Horne: irrelevant
4 days
  -> Excuse me? How is it irrelevant? Thanks so much for your input, which I in turn find irrelevant.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
actress' dress


Explanation:
Kate L. Turabian says in her book "A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertation" (every college student's reference book) that:
{For some common nouns euphony dictates adding only an apostrophe. For righteousness' sake}.
Actress thereby being a common noun, "actress' dress" should be the choice.

humbird
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Scott Horne: Irrelevant: _for righteousness' sake_ is a different case
4 days
  -> Yes it is relavant. Issue here is common noun, apostrophee"s" and possessive. Both actress and righteousness are common nouns. In case of doubt, you should send letter of inquiry to that effect to Ms. Turabian.
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Changes made by editors
Jan 9, 2006 - Changes made by Fuad Yahya:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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