programme vs program

English translation: Be and AE (but computer prograM - both UK & US)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:programme vs program
English translation:Be and AE (but computer prograM - both UK & US)
Entered by: Miroslawa Jodlowiec

18:06 Oct 11, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: programme vs program
It probably is a very daft question, but what is the difference between them?

For example, I always thought that cumputer programs was supposed to be written as programmes...
Miroslawa Jodlowiec
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:35
Be and AE
Explanation:
programme is British English and program is American English

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 min (2004-10-11 18:08:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo: read BE

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2004-10-11 18:10:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

However, even in BE program is commonly used in texts related to computers

Oxford Dictionary of English

program

noun & verb US spelling of programme (also widely used in computing contexts)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2004-10-11 18:19:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Chambers 21st Century Dictionary

programme or (N Amer) program noun
(...)
5. (usually program) computing a set of coded instructions to a computer for the performance of a task or a series of operations, written in any of various programming languages.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2004-10-11 18:45:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Also see the answers for a similar question
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/393762
Selected response from:

Selcuk Akyuz
Turkey
Local time: 16:35
Grading comment
Thanks to all very much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +19UK v. US
Refugio
5 +16Be and AE
Selcuk Akyuz
3 +5almost no difference
Derek Gill Franßen


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
almost no difference


Explanation:
I'm not sure, but the difference - if there is one at all - is very slight. It may only be a difference between English and American, "program" being the American version, though I have seen "programme" used infrequently in the US to describe the acts in a play or musical performance for example. :-)

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 15:35
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sonja29 (X)
1 min

agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver: Yep, I've seen that use for "programme", too, in AE.
2 mins

neutral  Refugio: Americans wishing to seem a little more high-class may opt for (sometimes old-fashioned) British spellings, such as programme, theatre, and Ye Olde ... Shoppe.
10 mins

agree  Jörgen Slet
6 hrs

agree  mportal: in the UK ,I think it can depend on whether the subject area is perceived to be American/ultra-modern, or not: computer programs, a programme on the radio,for example.
15 hrs

agree  Marijke Singer
19 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +16
Be and AE


Explanation:
programme is British English and program is American English

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 min (2004-10-11 18:08:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo: read BE

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2004-10-11 18:10:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

However, even in BE program is commonly used in texts related to computers

Oxford Dictionary of English

program

noun & verb US spelling of programme (also widely used in computing contexts)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2004-10-11 18:19:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Chambers 21st Century Dictionary

programme or (N Amer) program noun
(...)
5. (usually program) computing a set of coded instructions to a computer for the performance of a task or a series of operations, written in any of various programming languages.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2004-10-11 18:45:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Also see the answers for a similar question
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/393762


Selcuk Akyuz
Turkey
Local time: 16:35
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
Grading comment
Thanks to all very much!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ileania
0 min
  -> Thanks

agree  Ariser
1 min
  -> Thanks

agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver: Same as with favo(u)rite, colo(u)r, etc.
2 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Lucie Fourneyron
2 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  sonja29 (X)
5 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Alaa Zeineldine: When it relates to computers it is written program specifically when it is a computer program.
9 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  David Knowles: In UK English, program is universal for computer program, and programme everywhere else.
13 mins
  -> Well, I would say not universal but common

agree  John Bowden: With David - "programme" in BE except when referring to computers (verb and noun)
19 mins
  -> I agree with David; use of "program" related to computers is common, but there are many who still prefer to use programme, I suppose the young people opt for program

agree  Anna Tomashevskaya
54 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Nazim Aziz Gokdemir
2 hrs
  -> Tesekkur ederim

agree  senin
2 hrs
  -> Tesekkur ederim

agree  RHELLER: no difference :-)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Kardi Kho
6 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Jörgen Slet
6 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Syeda Tanbira Zaman
15 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  nlingua
2 days 22 mins
  -> Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +19
UK v. US


Explanation:
+

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 mins (2004-10-11 18:09:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

No difference except for British v. American spelling .

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2004-10-11 18:16:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

We Americans have a tendency to streamline spelling, e.g., esthetics for aesthetics, encyclopedia for encyclopaedia, color for colour, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2004-10-11 18:19:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also, our British colleagues have demonstrated a preference for adhering more closely to etymological spelling. Programme comes from the Latin and Greek programma.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 days 33 mins (2004-10-13 18:40:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course, by way of the French, as Peter points out. ;~}

Refugio
Local time: 06:35
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ileania
0 min
  -> Thanks, Ileania

agree  Ariser
1 min
  -> Thanks, Ariser

agree  sonja29 (X)
5 mins
  -> Thanks, Sonja

agree  mardes (X)
7 mins
  -> Thanks, Mardes

agree  jccantrell
15 mins
  -> Thanks, JC

agree  Enza Longo
16 mins
  -> Thanks, Enzalo

agree  John Bowden: "Program" for computers in BE, taken over from AE, but "a TV programme" etc.
18 mins
  -> Thanks, John

agree  Anna Tomashevskaya
54 mins
  -> Thanks, Anna

agree  Kathy O
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Kathy

agree  Nazim Aziz Gokdemir
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Nazim

agree  senin
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Senin

agree  RHELLER: no difference :-)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rita

agree  Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com (X): No difference. Both spellings are used.
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Anna

agree  Jörgen Slet
6 hrs
  -> Thank you, Jörgen

agree  Syeda Tanbira Zaman
15 hrs
  -> Thank you, Syeda

agree  Peter Linton: Worth pointing out that the Oxford English dictionary gives preference to "program", by analogy with anagram, diagram, telegram. Programme was adopted from French, not Latin, and OED says it is now established except in connection with computing.
18 hrs
  -> Thanks, Peter

agree  Tehani
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, Tehani

agree  nlingua
2 days 21 mins
  -> Thanks, nlingua

agree  Eva Olsson
7 days
  -> Thank you, Eva
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search