fog vs mist

English translation: fog is thick, and mist is light

03:43 Apr 7, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: fog vs mist
What is the different btw the two please . tq
baby
English translation:fog is thick, and mist is light
Explanation:
Not to put too scientific a point on it.
Selected response from:

Lesley Clarke
Mexico
Local time: 10:55
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3fog is thick, and mist is light
Lesley Clarke
4 +3definitions
Robert Donahue (X)
4 +2HTH
Tsogt Gombosuren


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
HTH


Explanation:
A mist is a collection of liquid droplets suspended in air. A mist can be formed when spraying or splashing a liquid. It can also be formed when a vapour condenses into liquid droplets in the air. (See also Aerosol.)
ccinfoweb.ccohs.ca/help/msds/msdstermse.html

Fog is cloud in contact with the ground. It occurs when moisture from the surface of the Earth evaporates; as this evaporated moisture moves upward, it cools and condenses into the familiar phenomenon of fog. Fog differs from clouds in that fog touches the surface of the Earth, while clouds do not. It can form in a number of ways, depending on how the cooling that caused the condensation occurred: *Radiation fog is formed by the cooling of land after sunset by thermal (infrared) radiation in cal
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fog

Tsogt Gombosuren
Canada
Local time: 09:55
Native speaker of: Native in MongolianMongolian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Schubert
1 min
  -> Thanks Michael! :-)

agree  rangepost
10 mins
  -> Thanks a lot, rangepost! :-)
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1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
definitions


Explanation:
fog1 (fôg, f¼g) n. 1. Condensed water vapor in cloudlike masses lying close to the ground and limiting visibility. 2.a. An obscuring haze, as of atmospheric dust or smoke. b. A mist or film clouding a surface, as of a window, lens, or mirror. 3. A cloud of vaporized liquid, especially a chemical spray used in fighting fires. 4.a. A state of mental vagueness or bewilderment. b. Something that obscures or conceals; a haze: shrouded their actions in a fog of disinformation. 5. A blur on a developed photographic image. --fog v. fogged, fog·ging, fogs. --tr. 1. To cover or envelop with or as if with fog. 2. To cause to be obscured; cloud. 3. To make vague, hazy, or confused: a memory that had been fogged by time. 4. To obscure or dim (a photographic image). --intr. 1. To be covered with or as if with fog. 2. To be blurred, clouded, or obscured: My glasses fogged in the warm air. 3. To be dimmed or obscured. Used of a photographic image. [Perhaps of Scandinavian origin.] --fog“ger n.
fog2 (fôg, f¼g) n. 1. A new growth of grass appearing on a field that has been mowed or grazed. 2. Tall, decaying grass left standing after the cutting or grazing season. [Middle English fogge, tall grass. See pü- below.]
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pü-. Important derivatives are: foul, filth, defile1, fuzzy, putrid, potpourri, putrefy, purulent, pus. .
pü-. To rot, decay. 1. Suffixed form *p¿-lo-. a. FOUL, from Old English f¿l, unclean, rotten; b. FULMAR, from Old Norse f¿ll, foul; c. FILTH, from Old English fþlth, foulness, from Germanic abstract noun *f¿lith½; d. FILE3; DEFILE1, from Old English fþlan, to sully, from Germanic denominative *f¿ljan, to soil, dirty. a, b, c, and d all from Germanic *f¿laz, rotten, filthy. 2. Extended form *pug-. FOG2, from Middle English fog, fogge, aftermath grass, from a Scandinavian source probably akin to Icelandic f¿ki, rotten sea grass, and Norwegian fogg, rank grass, from Germanic *fuk-. 3. Extended variant form *pous-. FUZZY, from Low German fussig, spongy, from Germanic *fausa-. 4. Suffixed form *pu-tri-. PUTRESCENT, PUTRID; (OLLA PODRIDA), (POTPOURRI), PUTREFY, from Latin puter (stem putri-), rotten. 5. Suffixed form *puw-os-. a. PURULENT, PUS; SUPPURATE, from Latin p¿s, pus; b. PYO-, from Greek puon, puos, pus. 6. EMPYEMA, from Greek compound empuein, to suppurate (en-, in; see en). [Pokorny 2. pü- 848.]


mist (m¹st) n. 1. A mass of fine droplets of water in the atmosphere near or in contact with the earth. 2. Water vapor condensed on and clouding the appearance of a surface. 3. Fine drops of a liquid, such as water, perfume, or medication, sprayed into the air. 4. A suspension of fine drops of a liquid in a gas. 5. Something that dims or conceals. 6. A haze before the eyes that blurs the vision. 7. Something that produces or gives the impression of dimness or obscurity: the mists of the past. 8. A drink consisting of a liquor served over cracked ice. --mist v. mist·ed, mist·ing, mists. --intr. 1. To be or become obscured or blurred by or as if by mist. 2. To rain in a fine shower. --tr. 1. To conceal or veil as if with mist. 2. To moisturize (plants or dry air, for example) with a fine spray of water. [Middle English, from Old English. See meigh- below.]
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meigh-. Important derivatives are: mist, mistletoe.
meigh-. To urinate. 1.a. MIST, from Old English mist, mist; b. MIZZLE1, from Middle English misellen, to drizzle, from a source perhaps akin to Dutch dialectal mieselen, to drizzle; c. (MISSEL THRUSH), MISTLETOE, from Old English mistel, mistletoe, from Germanic diminutive form *mihst-ila-, mistletoe (which is propagated through the droppings of the missel thrush). a, b, and c all from Germanic suffixed form *mih-stu-, urine, hence mist, fine rain. 2. Suffixed form *migh-tu-. MICTURATE, from Latin micturºre, to want to urinate (desiderative of meiere, to urinate). [Pokorny meik- 713.]



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Note added at 2 mins (2005-04-07 03:46:33 GMT)
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So it appears that there isn\'t much difference at all.

Robert Donahue (X)
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Schubert: Oh my! I'll agree if you don't make me read the whole thing! :-)
1 min
  -> Thanks Michael

agree  rangepost
10 mins
  -> Thanks Rangepost

agree  Amy Williams: rank, rotten grass, pus and urine. How did you get that out of fog and mist?! Yikes! :)
1 hr
  -> Straight out of the American Heritage Dictionary. You can't make that stuff up : )
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
fog is thick, and mist is light


Explanation:
Not to put too scientific a point on it.

Lesley Clarke
Mexico
Local time: 10:55
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Oso (X): straight and to the point! ¶:^) Kudoz!
16 mins

agree  Amy Williams
1 hr

agree  Refugio
15 hrs
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