pouring

English translation: pawing (the ground): homophonic spelling mistake

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:pouring (Australia)
English translation:pawing (the ground): homophonic spelling mistake
Entered by: Gabrielle Leyden

10:00 Mar 21, 2012
English to English translations [PRO]
Livestock / Animal Husbandry / Australian term
English term or phrase: pouring
Things not to do if you want to avoid quarter cracks and remain on good terms with your farrier: "leave a horse POURING in the cross-ties bay"

Does the guy mean "with blood gushing out of a wound" or does pouring mean something else "down under". In the latter case, I need a British or American equivalent.

TIA!

Gabrielle
Gabrielle Leyden
Belgium
Local time: 13:03
pawing (the ground): spelling mistake
Explanation:
I see Catherine has suggested this just as I was about to post. Everything points to this. Farriers are people who attend to horse's feet. A quarter crack is a crack in the hoof. "Cross tie" means securing the horse for attention. If it paws the ground (ie. runs its hoofs along the ground, probably because it is agitated and distressed at being cross-tied), it may well damage its hoof, especially since it is presumably unshod at the time.

Plenty of people have problems spelling the homophones "Pour" "paw" and "pore", and not particularly in Australia. Here are seven examples from Australia of "pouring the ground", all of which should read "pawing the ground":

https://www.google.es/search?num=100&hl=es&lr=&cr=countryAU&...

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Note added at 57 mins (2012-03-21 10:57:55 GMT)
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I should be more careful when commenting on other peoples' mistakes: I meant to write "Farriers are people who attend to horses' feet". "Runs its hoofs along the ground" is not wrong, but the plural of hoof is more commonly "hooves".
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 13:03
Grading comment
It's all in the pronunciation! Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3pawing (the ground): spelling mistake
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
pawing (the ground): spelling mistake


Explanation:
I see Catherine has suggested this just as I was about to post. Everything points to this. Farriers are people who attend to horse's feet. A quarter crack is a crack in the hoof. "Cross tie" means securing the horse for attention. If it paws the ground (ie. runs its hoofs along the ground, probably because it is agitated and distressed at being cross-tied), it may well damage its hoof, especially since it is presumably unshod at the time.

Plenty of people have problems spelling the homophones "Pour" "paw" and "pore", and not particularly in Australia. Here are seven examples from Australia of "pouring the ground", all of which should read "pawing the ground":

https://www.google.es/search?num=100&hl=es&lr=&cr=countryAU&...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 57 mins (2012-03-21 10:57:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I should be more careful when commenting on other peoples' mistakes: I meant to write "Farriers are people who attend to horses' feet". "Runs its hoofs along the ground" is not wrong, but the plural of hoof is more commonly "hooves".

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 13:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
It's all in the pronunciation! Thanks!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, Charles. I'll try to remember absent/present "r"s the next time I'm stumped!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martin Riordan: A fine example of the Internet "legitimising" mistakes.
11 mins
  -> Yes indeed. But it's also useful for finding which mistakes people tend to make. Thanks, Martin!

agree  B D Finch
38 mins
  -> Thanks, Barbara (if I may).

agree  Ty Kendall: POUR / PAW / PORE / POOR ....in this case, it should definitely be "paw". (I live on a farm) - Sheep do it when they're about to give birth and horses do it for any number of reasons - in this case: frustration.
1 hr
  -> Thanks for the first-hand confirmation, Ty!
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