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Please write down their meanings and usage

English translation: Hi, Junaid.

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09:41 Oct 26, 2001
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing
English term or phrase: Please write down their meanings and usage
Please write down their meanings and usage.

1). Here you are.
2). There you go.
3). Please Take It.
4). Here it is.
junaid qaiser
English translation:Hi, Junaid.
Explanation:
They are all used when you give something to somebody, That he/she asked for. The differences are very slight:
1) Here you are (a sandwhich, a pencil, a cup of tea, some papers, whatever, despite the number, gender, etc.))
2). There you go. Idem the previous one. This is more colloquial.
3). Please Take It. The same as the 2 previous ones, though this is more formal or more polite. You should write Please take it.
4). Here it is. The only difference with 1) is that the number and gender are defined here by IT.
Hope it helps you!
Selected response from:

mónica alfonso
Local time: 10:08
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4Hi, Junaid.
mónica alfonso
5 +3Fully agree with...Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
5 +2Just adding a few more details...AngelaMR


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Hi, Junaid.


Explanation:
They are all used when you give something to somebody, That he/she asked for. The differences are very slight:
1) Here you are (a sandwhich, a pencil, a cup of tea, some papers, whatever, despite the number, gender, etc.))
2). There you go. Idem the previous one. This is more colloquial.
3). Please Take It. The same as the 2 previous ones, though this is more formal or more polite. You should write Please take it.
4). Here it is. The only difference with 1) is that the number and gender are defined here by IT.
Hope it helps you!


mónica alfonso
Local time: 10:08
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO): see below
7 mins
  -> Thanks. I think this person means the expressions with their shades of meaning (not all their meanings)

agree  Nina Engberg
51 mins
  -> Thank you, Nina

agree  athena22
10 hrs
  -> Thnx, athena

agree  Kemal Mustajbegovic
1 day 20 hrs
  -> Thank you
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Fully agree with...


Explanation:
....Monica, but I'd like to add one more aspect to "there you go": this phrase is often used as a "filler" in conversations, quite similar to "OK", "alright", etc. In other words, it is used to show some level of agreement with your conversation partner.

Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 08:08
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nina Engberg
42 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  AngelaMR: Definitely!
7 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  athena22: Sometimes "there you go" can mean, "you've got it right, now," too. Context is all for this one.
10 hrs
  -> Absolutely
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Just adding a few more details...


Explanation:
All the other answers are good explanations. Here's another quick view for you:

Here you are/There you go:
Usually when we say "here you are" or "there you go," we're giving "you" something you already expected or asked for. For example, if we're sitting at the dinner table and we're passing a bowl of salad around, I would hand you the bowl and say "Here you go." Or, maybe you asked me to pass you the salt... I would hand it to you and say "There you go."

Here it is/Here they are:
Usually, when we say "here it is" we're presenting something that may have been lost or misplaced. For example, if you are looking for your keys and I see them on the table, I pick them up, hand them to you and say "Here they are." Or, if we're at dinner and you say "where's the butter?" I say, "Here it is," and I give it to you.

Please take it:
Honestly, I would say this is the least natural phrase of all the above. Although I won't fully deny that it is "polite," I have to argue that when used incorrectly, it may sound pushy. Of course, it all depends on your tone of voice and the context of the situation. For example, if you are at a store with one of your friends and you need to get your wallet out of your pocket, but you are holding too many bags, you may look at your friend and gesture for him/her to take the bag by saying "please take this for me." That would be polite, as opposed to just saying "hold this" or "take this for me."

There are countless ways of using the phrases you've asked about. These are just a few basic usage suggestions. I hope I've help clarify your doubts a bit.

Good luck!

AngelaMR

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rosemary Schmid: Excellent response.
19 hrs
  -> Thanks! :)

agree  Fuad Yahya: Perfect
1 day 7 hrs
  -> Thanks!
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