unwaxed lemon

English translation: lemons not treated with wax

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:unwaxed lemon
English translation:lemons not treated with wax
Entered by: Olga Simon

17:17 Jan 19, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing
English term or phrase: unwaxed lemon
It is from a Scottish recipe for a lemon tart. I checked it in my dictionary - one of the meanings of "wax" is to diminish, grow smaller (like the moon is waning or waxing).

Would that mean in simple English that "unwaxed lemons" are just "large lemons"?

Also what is "double cream" -is it heavy cream?

Thanks a lot!
Olga Simon
Hungary
Local time: 17:55
lemons not treated with wax
Explanation:
To preserve the freshness of the skin, most citrus fruit is soaked, washed and waxed before packing. Waxed and unwaxed lemons are available. Unwaxed lemons are ideal for slicing and adding to drinks or using as a garnish and when the zest is required. If a recipe uses lemon juice waxed lemons are the best choice. If you prefer to use unwaxed lemons but only waxed are available, simply lightly scrub the peel first to remove the wax.

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Note added at 2003-01-19 17:24:44 (GMT)
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Double cream
When cows\' milk reaches the dairy, it contains a liquid substance called butterfat, and this, when it\'s skimmed off the surface of the milk, is cream, or what we know as double cream. It is extremely rich with a minimum fat content of 48 per cent. Because of this it can stand being boiled in cooking without separating, and can be whipped to a fluffy, spreadable consistency.


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Note added at 2003-01-19 17:26:28 (GMT)
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Single cream
This is a much thinner cream, good for pouring and for cooking with when you need more creaminess than milk. Because it has only a minimum of 18 per cent fat, it\'s not suitable for boiling, as it will curdle.

Extra thick double or single cream
These are as described for double or single cream, but have been treated to give them a consistency that is suitable for spooning on to pies and desserts without having to bother with whisking them first.

Clotted cream
Wait for it – this is the big one! Perhaps you\'d rather not know, but it has at least 55 per cent butterfat. Clotted cream has a unique and special dairy colour, like pale buttercups, and is thick, rich and utterly irresistible. It is a speciality of the rich pastureland of the West Country, and is made by heating the cream to evaporate some of the liquids, so, in a sense, you could call it concentrated cream. It is heaven spread on scones with home-made preserves and extra special on tart fruit pies.

http://www.deliaonline.com
Selected response from:

Patricia CASEY
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:55
Grading comment
Dear Patricia, thank you so much for your elaborate answer.

Since we recently got relocated to Bosnia-Herzegovina (my husband's present assignment) I guess I should just go and get ordinary lemons from a local grocery store, as there is no way there will be a choice of "waxed" and "unwaxed" ones :-).

Lemon tart is on the way!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +14lemons not treated with wax
Patricia CASEY
4See explanation
Kim Metzger


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +14
lemons not treated with wax


Explanation:
To preserve the freshness of the skin, most citrus fruit is soaked, washed and waxed before packing. Waxed and unwaxed lemons are available. Unwaxed lemons are ideal for slicing and adding to drinks or using as a garnish and when the zest is required. If a recipe uses lemon juice waxed lemons are the best choice. If you prefer to use unwaxed lemons but only waxed are available, simply lightly scrub the peel first to remove the wax.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-19 17:24:44 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Double cream
When cows\' milk reaches the dairy, it contains a liquid substance called butterfat, and this, when it\'s skimmed off the surface of the milk, is cream, or what we know as double cream. It is extremely rich with a minimum fat content of 48 per cent. Because of this it can stand being boiled in cooking without separating, and can be whipped to a fluffy, spreadable consistency.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-19 17:26:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Single cream
This is a much thinner cream, good for pouring and for cooking with when you need more creaminess than milk. Because it has only a minimum of 18 per cent fat, it\'s not suitable for boiling, as it will curdle.

Extra thick double or single cream
These are as described for double or single cream, but have been treated to give them a consistency that is suitable for spooning on to pies and desserts without having to bother with whisking them first.

Clotted cream
Wait for it – this is the big one! Perhaps you\'d rather not know, but it has at least 55 per cent butterfat. Clotted cream has a unique and special dairy colour, like pale buttercups, and is thick, rich and utterly irresistible. It is a speciality of the rich pastureland of the West Country, and is made by heating the cream to evaporate some of the liquids, so, in a sense, you could call it concentrated cream. It is heaven spread on scones with home-made preserves and extra special on tart fruit pies.

http://www.deliaonline.com

Patricia CASEY
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:55
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 22
Grading comment
Dear Patricia, thank you so much for your elaborate answer.

Since we recently got relocated to Bosnia-Herzegovina (my husband's present assignment) I guess I should just go and get ordinary lemons from a local grocery store, as there is no way there will be a choice of "waxed" and "unwaxed" ones :-).

Lemon tart is on the way!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Clair@Lexeme
2 mins
  -> Thank you, Clair!!

agree  Peter Coles: Exactly and well put.
3 mins
  -> Thank you, Peter!!

agree  Attila Piróth
3 mins
  -> Thank you Attila!

agree  xxxcmwilliams
7 mins

agree  NancyLynn: just right.
7 mins

agree  Marian Greenfield: that's it of course
8 mins

agree  JH Trads
8 mins

agree  Paul Stevens: Excellent and very educational too!
14 mins

agree  EdithK
16 mins

agree  Refugio
18 mins

agree  OlafK
33 mins

agree  Gayle Wallimann
41 mins

agree  Drak
48 mins
  -> Thanks everybody!!!!

agree  Liv Bliss: I'd welcome you to come and stay at my house any time, in hopes that you'd bring some of your recipes and a yen to cook
1 hr
  -> Very tempting... Thanks!!! ;-D
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
See explanation


Explanation:
Unwaxed

Waxing is a process used to preserve the freshness of the skin of citrus fruits, they are soaked, washed and waxed before packing. Unwaxed lemons or limes are also available in Waitrose. Unwaxed lemons are ideal for slicing and adding to drinks or using as a garnish and when the zest is required.

If you prefer to use unwaxed lemons but only waxed are available, simply lightly scrub the peel first to remove the wax.


http://www.waitrose.com/food_drink/Recipes/glossary/cookingg...



    Reference: http://www.waitrose.com/food_drink/Recipes/glossary/cookingg...
Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 10:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249
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