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English translation: It depends

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10:46 May 9, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Marketing / Market Research / marketing
English term or phrase: supermarket
Hi,

What is the commonly used term for those 'colourful sheets' supermarkets produce to advertise special offers etc?
I need just one word if possible as I've to fit it in all over the place in graphs, tables etc..
Thanks
xxxAnneM
Local time: 05:20
English translation:It depends
Explanation:
It depends both on location (of the advertisement) - on a window, in a letterbox, handed out in person, stuffed into a newspaper or magazine, etc., AND on whether it's British or American English.

"Flyer" as suggested by others is correct, but usually used to indicate an advertisement which is either handed out in person (in Britain, perhaps a "circular" or a "hand-bill") or is hand delivered to households, put into their letter boxes. It could also be called, in that case, a "hand-out", but that very specifically limits it, you guessed it, handing it out.

Hanging on the supermarket window, suggesting a special offer or new product, it could be a "poster", a "promotion", a "special offer", or simply an "advertisement" (not a great choice).

As an insert into a newspaper or magazine, it can be an "insert", a "supplement" (as in a full page or more of colourful adverts (ads) that one finds in one's Sunday paper, for instance), or one of a few less used variations.

It could be something like a "bulletin" or "notice", but those are too vague and definitely NOT recommended.

In US colloquial, it could be a "puff piece" or a "poop sheet", but those are not universal and I wouldn't say widely used. Furthermore, they are not expressions I would personally use in this context, no matter where this "colourful sheet" is placed. :-)

In the US and Canada, "Flyer" can also be spelled (according to Oxford), "Flier", but I think the former ("flyer") is the preferred spelling universally.

It could also be a "brochure" or a "leaflet", but to my mind those suggest more than one page. They would be bad choices, imo, for this context.

I agree with others on "flyer" as the most satisfactory word for the broadest context. However, it it's a "poster" that sits in the window of this supermarket, I wouldn't use it - I would use one of the alternate choices. However, if you specifically know the context of this "affiche", such as a magazine insert or newspaper supplement, etc., I would consider one of the other choices.

"Flyer" to me specifically connotes hand-outs and hand delivered circulars, as mentioned above.

PS. If you are putting it all over the place around graphs and tables, it suggests to me that you are talking about special offer/promotion posters, leaflets, inserts, etc. If this is contrasted, in a budget for instance, with other advertising expenditures, "flyer" would be acceptable as the universal term. Or "circular" (Br.)

Tell more about context and I'll suggest a single choice.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 14:33:38 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In the context mentioned, I suppose \"circulars\" or \"flyers\" (I prefer that spelling, even for USA) are okay, but I prefer Dan\'s thinking and personally would opt for \"print advertising\" (which, following Dan\'s suggestion, you could say would be referred to as \"ad copy\" or even just \"ads\" from then on, unless there is another category for radio and television advertising).

The relationship to \"prospectus\" escapes me totally - it has an entirely different connotation to me. It\'s sort of like... well... the \"poop\" on a company. LOL. (That was for you, Rita.)
Selected response from:

Terence Riley
Local time: 04:20
Grading comment
thank you for your detailed answer
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +11flyers
swisstell
4 +6It dependsTerence Riley
5 +3CircularMaria Nicholas
4 +4flyers
Mary Worby
5handouts
Arthur Borges
4 +1leaflet?xxxDell
1 +1"printed specials advertising (psa)" or similarDan McCrosky


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +11
flyers


Explanation:
a flyer

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 18:32:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Atomica: flyer or flier
a pamphlet or circular for mass distribution

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 05:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
1 min
  -> thanks, Ahmed

agree  Jan Liebelt
29 mins
  -> thanks, Jan

agree  Michael Estes
30 mins
  -> thank you, Michael

agree  Ligia Dias Costa
31 mins
  -> thank you, Ligia

agree  jerrie
54 mins
  -> thank you, Jerrie

agree  Lydia Molea
1 hr
  -> thank you, Lydia

agree  Yoshiro Shibasaki, PhD
2 hrs
  -> domo arigato, Yoshiro

neutral  Maria Nicholas: I believe that "flier" is this instance is spelled with an "i"
2 hrs
  -> both are used, see my remark above which I added based on your doubts

agree  Fuad Yahya: According to the American Heritage Dictionary, both spellings are acceptable.
3 hrs
  -> thank you, Fuad

agree  athena22: Or circular
3 hrs
  -> thank you, Athena

neutral  Arthur Borges: To me, fliers are aircraft pilots, while flyers are tame flat bits of paper...
4 hrs
  -> for the doubters like you, I have added a reference above. Also, when I was in the advertising business, we did call them FLYERS

agree  Mike Sekine
5 hrs
  -> thanks, Mike

agree  Сергей Лузан
4 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
flyers


Explanation:
Don't think we've got a one word equivalent that conveys 'small glossy leaflet sent out by post or picked up in store detailing current offers and promotions'! I'd call it a flyer, or a 'special offer brochure' or something.

HTH

Mary

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
1 min

agree  Jan Liebelt
28 mins

agree  jerrie
53 mins

agree  Сергей Лузан
4 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
It depends


Explanation:
It depends both on location (of the advertisement) - on a window, in a letterbox, handed out in person, stuffed into a newspaper or magazine, etc., AND on whether it's British or American English.

"Flyer" as suggested by others is correct, but usually used to indicate an advertisement which is either handed out in person (in Britain, perhaps a "circular" or a "hand-bill") or is hand delivered to households, put into their letter boxes. It could also be called, in that case, a "hand-out", but that very specifically limits it, you guessed it, handing it out.

Hanging on the supermarket window, suggesting a special offer or new product, it could be a "poster", a "promotion", a "special offer", or simply an "advertisement" (not a great choice).

As an insert into a newspaper or magazine, it can be an "insert", a "supplement" (as in a full page or more of colourful adverts (ads) that one finds in one's Sunday paper, for instance), or one of a few less used variations.

It could be something like a "bulletin" or "notice", but those are too vague and definitely NOT recommended.

In US colloquial, it could be a "puff piece" or a "poop sheet", but those are not universal and I wouldn't say widely used. Furthermore, they are not expressions I would personally use in this context, no matter where this "colourful sheet" is placed. :-)

In the US and Canada, "Flyer" can also be spelled (according to Oxford), "Flier", but I think the former ("flyer") is the preferred spelling universally.

It could also be a "brochure" or a "leaflet", but to my mind those suggest more than one page. They would be bad choices, imo, for this context.

I agree with others on "flyer" as the most satisfactory word for the broadest context. However, it it's a "poster" that sits in the window of this supermarket, I wouldn't use it - I would use one of the alternate choices. However, if you specifically know the context of this "affiche", such as a magazine insert or newspaper supplement, etc., I would consider one of the other choices.

"Flyer" to me specifically connotes hand-outs and hand delivered circulars, as mentioned above.

PS. If you are putting it all over the place around graphs and tables, it suggests to me that you are talking about special offer/promotion posters, leaflets, inserts, etc. If this is contrasted, in a budget for instance, with other advertising expenditures, "flyer" would be acceptable as the universal term. Or "circular" (Br.)

Tell more about context and I'll suggest a single choice.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 14:33:38 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In the context mentioned, I suppose \"circulars\" or \"flyers\" (I prefer that spelling, even for USA) are okay, but I prefer Dan\'s thinking and personally would opt for \"print advertising\" (which, following Dan\'s suggestion, you could say would be referred to as \"ad copy\" or even just \"ads\" from then on, unless there is another category for radio and television advertising).

The relationship to \"prospectus\" escapes me totally - it has an entirely different connotation to me. It\'s sort of like... well... the \"poop\" on a company. LOL. (That was for you, Rita.)

Terence Riley
Local time: 04:20
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
thank you for your detailed answer

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  RHELLER: great info -poop sheet would not go over well in the US :-)
1 hr
  -> LMAO! That's funny. But a couple of generations ago, "poop" wasn't uncommon as a colloq. for "info(rmation)" You know, "the lowdown", "the dope", etc.

agree  Maria Nicholas: Agree with "circular" -- see below
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Maria Knorr
4 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Сергей Лузан
4 days
  -> Thanks

agree  AhmedAMS
45 days
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Circular


Explanation:
I'm pretty sure this is it (in U.S. English, anyway).

e.g. "In today's circular, 'Be Clean' soap is 50% off."

Maria Nicholas
Local time: 23:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GreekGreek

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  athena22: Or as above. I've heard both.
39 mins

agree  Lilian Vardanyan
17 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
3 days22 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"printed specials advertising (psa)" or similar


Explanation:
The first problem here is that everyone, especially Terence, is right. "Flyer" is a good choice but the problem of delivery creates problems. Sometimes the same gaudily printed sheet of weekly specials is an insert in a local newspaper, handed out in the supermarket itself, and stuffed in home mailboxes by the postal service or specialist distribution firms. Other problems are the choice of spelling and English variations between continents.

Perhaps "flyer" would also be too restrictive and not clear enough in its meaning. The correct explanatory term would be something like "printed specials advertisements" or "printed specials advertising" but such terms would of course be much too long.

You might write one of them out once somewhere near the beginning of your project, followed by your own abbreviated form creation and then use that on all the graphs, etc. Something like:

"printed specials advertising (psa)"

or

"printed specials advertising (specads)" (No pertinent Google English hits)

or

"printed specials advertising (specials ads)" (70 Google English hits, none .uk domain)

I have done this sort of thing often, especially for PowerPoint presentations where space is always a problem. My customers have never complained and keep coming back for more.

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 05:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Terence Riley: Partially agree - I would say "print advertising".
16 mins
  -> I feel the word "specials" is very important here to indicate that these are sale items and not general printed advertising
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
handouts


Explanation:
Used mainly to describe photocopies handed out by the prof/teacher at the end of a course, but extended to any piece of paper intended for manual distribution. But now that this is thinking itself through, I'd use "flyer".

Arthur Borges
China
Local time: 11:20
Works in field
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
leaflet?


Explanation:
...

xxxDell

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  fcl: prospectus = leaflet (reverse engineering)
1 hr
  -> good to see another engineer :-)
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