\"You received this email\" or \"You HAVE received this email\"?

English translation: HAVE received

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13:13 Mar 28, 2018
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing - Marketing / Market Research / grammar/use of English verb tenses
English term or phrase: \"You received this email\" or \"You HAVE received this email\"?
Which wording is better?

**** You received this email because you are subscribed either to {Product} blog updates or {Product} news and announcements.

or

**** You have received this email because you are subscribed either to {Product} blog updates or {Product} news and announcements.

Please explain your reasoning if possible. Thank you!
Mikhail Kropotov
Russian Federation
Local time: 21:19
English translation:HAVE received
Explanation:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Present_perfect


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Note added at 18 mins (2018-03-28 13:32:14 GMT)
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UK and US English

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Note added at 20 mins (2018-03-28 13:33:46 GMT)
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Sorry to the people who agreed with my reference - I meant to post it as answer

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Note added at 32 mins (2018-03-28 13:45:52 GMT)
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As I said in the discussion - it could be "you received" if the message is given after the email has been received, rather than simultaneously.
Selected response from:

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 20:19
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +10HAVE received
Mark Nathan


Discussion entries: 12





  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
\"you received this email\" or \"you have received this email\"?
HAVE received


Explanation:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Present_perfect


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2018-03-28 13:32:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

UK and US English

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2018-03-28 13:33:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry to the people who agreed with my reference - I meant to post it as answer

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 32 mins (2018-03-28 13:45:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As I said in the discussion - it could be "you received" if the message is given after the email has been received, rather than simultaneously.

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 20:19
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Notes to answerer
Asker: I was looking for an explanation of why this grammar construction is preferred. I've added a little more context to the discussion area. Sorry for not providing it from the beginning!

Asker: Thank you!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Taña Dalglish: Agree. "If you think you have received an e-mail containing a virus, you should delete it immediately". http://www.grammaring.com/participle-clauses
2 mins

agree  Joris Lenstra: Assuming that it's a past event at an unspecified time and carries consequences for the present
4 mins

agree  FreEditor
5 mins

agree  Robert Forstag
20 mins

neutral  philgoddard: This is a UK/US difference. In the UK it would be "you have received". In the US, you can also say "you received".
30 mins
  -> or even, "Why've I gotten this email?"

agree  katsy
30 mins

agree  Jack Doughty
34 mins

agree  Charles Davis: You can probably say "you received" in US Eng, but in UK Eng I think it's "have received" because the receipt is very recent and belongs to a present time-frame; this is intended to be read during receipt.
54 mins

agree  Tony M: I think both are fine
2 hrs

agree  Ashutosh Mitra
13 hrs

agree  LaraBarnett
22 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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