500-foot-pounds

English translation: 500 foot-pounds

12:01 Apr 26, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Mechanics / Mech Engineering
English term or phrase: 500-foot-pounds
"The tamping blade mounting bolts, there are three to each tamping blade, and they should be torqued to 500-foot-pounds when installed, or whenever you change tamping blades and you torque them back down, they should be torqued to 500-foot-pounds."

What does "500-foot-pounds" mean? the dashes are confusing me.Could you please express it in simpler way?

Thank you!
Waleed Mohamed
United Arab Emirates
Local time: 12:49
English translation:500 foot-pounds
Explanation:
Nothing more than that. That's one of the standard units of measure for torque.
Selected response from:

Mikhail Kropotov
Russian Federation
Local time: 11:49
Grading comment
Thank you all
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +7Common unit for torque
Rahi Moosavi
4 +5500 foot-pounds
Mikhail Kropotov
4 +1680 Nm
Richard Benham
4500 lbs-ft
swisstell
2 +2explanation, not for grading)
Robert Donahue (X)


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
500 foot-pounds


Explanation:
Nothing more than that. That's one of the standard units of measure for torque.

Mikhail Kropotov
Russian Federation
Local time: 11:49
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thank you all

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, the first dash is not needed (arguably: wrong), and is probably at the source of the confusion :-)
4 mins
  -> Yeah, I should have pointed this out myself. Thanks Dusty!

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
19 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  Java Cafe
54 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  Robert Donahue (X): I misread the first time through. The first dash is superfluous as Dusty said (and it is in fact a source of confusion : )
2 hrs
  -> It's about as close to being a mistake as it gets. Thanks Rob!

agree  Can Altinbay: The first dash is simply incorrect.
4 hrs
  -> Exactly the reason I took it out :) Thanks Can!
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
Common unit for torque


Explanation:
Torque is a measure of how much twisting is applied to a fastener. The units used to measure torque are in the form of force times length.
Foot-pounds (or better said (lbf·ft: pound-force feet)is a common unit for torque, as well as these units:

# newton metre (N·m)
# newton centimetres (N·cm)
# pound-force feet (lbf·ft)
# pound-force inches (lbf·in)
# ounce-force inches (ozf·in)
# deci newton metre (dN·m)
# kilogram-force centimetre (kgf·cm)

Rahi Moosavi
Canada
Local time: 04:49
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian), Native in Persian (Farsi)Persian (Farsi)
PRO pts in category: 63

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robert Donahue (X)
0 min
  -> Thanks

agree  Tony M: a force of 1 pound acting at a distance of 1 foot; conversion into metric is quite fun!
4 mins
  -> Tell me about it!

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
18 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
26 mins

agree  Didier Fourcot: Usual spelling with an hyphen is confusing, the abbreviation N.m of lbf.ft clearly implies the multiplication of Newtons by meters or pounds by feet
37 mins

agree  Java Cafe
54 mins

agree  Can Altinbay
4 hrs
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
500 lbs-ft


Explanation:
would be the normal way to write this, i.e. rev ersing the pound/foot that you indicate

Torque Capabilities of DC and AC Drives in the Constant Horsepower ... - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
... T = 750 lbs-ft x (1750 / 2625) = 500 lbs-ft The torque available from an AC
motor in ... DC, 750, 656, 570, 500, lbs-ft. AC, 750, 574, 434, 333, lbs-ft ...
www.powerqualityanddrives.com/ torque_constant_horsepower/

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 10:49
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 8
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
explanation, not for grading)


Explanation:
I can understand where the dash might be confusing, but it is in fact necassary (simply how the word is written). I have attached a definition and small explanation.

foot-pound

abbr. ft-lb, unit of work or energy in the customary English gravitational system; it is the work done or energy expended by a force of 1 pound acting through a distance of 1 foot. It is equal to 1.356 joules. The term foot-pound is also used to designate a unit of torque that is sometimes called the pound-foot to distinguish it from the energy unit. A force of 1 pound applied 1 foot from and perpendicular to the direction to an axis of rotation produces a 1 foot-pound (or pound-foot) torque at the axis.

Work: The definition of work is the application of a force over a distance. In order to make the concept of work a measurable and useful term, the distance only counts if it is in the direction of the force you apply. For example, lifting a 10-pound weight and putting it on a rack is an example of work. The force is the weight (10 pounds) and the distance is the height of the rack from the floor. If you lift the weight, carry it across the room, and put it on a rack, technically you haven't done any more work because the force of gravity is vertical and the transit across the room was horizontal.

The foot-pound, or ft-lb (distance times force), is the unit of work (it's also the unit of energy because work and energy are very similar) in the English gravitational system of measurement that we use. It is the work done by a force of 1 pound applied through a distance of 1 foot. So if you lift a 1-pound weight 1 foot, you've done 1 foot-pound worth of work. If you lift 2 pounds 2 feet, you've done 4 ft-lb of work.

The term foot-pound also designates units of torque. As a convenience, engineers typically reverse the order of the torque unit to pound-foot in order to distinguish it from the work unit. The order, foot-pounds or pounds-foot, doesn't matter because the terms are multiplied (2x1=1x2) and therefore equivalent.

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Note added at 25 mins (2005-04-26 12:26:07 GMT)
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necessary*


    Reference: http://www.bartleby.com/65/fo/footpoun.html
    Reference: http://www.sporttruck.com/techarticles/0312st_hp/
Robert Donahue (X)
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mikhail Kropotov: yes, the second dash, but not the first one
1 min
  -> right, second one : )

neutral  Richard Benham: [...].//On the subject of cultural differences, I'm sure if you asked your vistors from Adelaide (my home town), they'd confirm that it's very rude to call people Dick in Australia, even if their name is Richard.
40 mins
  -> Lest we forget that there are other countries in the world Richard, foot-lbs is "more normal" in the United States. Thank you for your comments : )+++Oops. Sorry about that.

agree  Can Altinbay: You're right, but I assume you're talking about the second one, whic the confusion comes from the first, which is incorrect.
4 hrs
  -> Yes I am Can. The first one wound up throwing me off too. Thanks.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
680 Nm


Explanation:
Unless I got the metric conversion wrong, this is close enough (even 700 Nm would probably be close enough). The whole antique Pommy system of units belongs in the history books...I mean who needs to know how far Henry VIII's (I think it was Henry VIII--one of those Pommy kings anyway) nose was from the tip of his outstretched fingers...or why there are 7.92 inches in a link and and 437.5 grains in an avoirdupois ounce but 480 grains in a Troy ounce, which happens to be the same as an apothecary's ounce, although the subunits are different....

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Note added at 1 hr 44 mins (2005-04-26 13:45:59 GMT)
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PS This is an example of the importance of distinguishing between mass and weight. Weight is a force, and represents the force exerted on a body by gravity (according to General Relativity, this is bunkum, but never mind, let\'s stick with Newtonian physics). Mass is essentially the amount of stuff in a body. Newton\'s equation tells us that F=ma (force is mass times acceleration), in the case of an object falling freely under gravity, a=g (g is the \"acceleration due to gravity, duh!); so we can say that F=mg, where the F here represents the weight.

The gravitational system uses \"pounds\" as a unit of weight, i.e. force, rather than mass. So we have to take account of this when converting from gravitational implerial units to metric units. 1 foot is equal to .3048m and one pound (mass) to .4536kg (approx), but then we have to multiply by the acceleration due to gravity, which is about 9.83 metres per second per second (I can\'t do superxcripts here; otherwise I\'d put that as ms with a \"-2\" superscript). This gives the figure of 680 I quoted above.

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 10:49
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Can Altinbay
3 hrs
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