Stop press

English translation: Latest!

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Stop press
Selected answer:Latest!
Entered by: B D Finch

10:32 Sep 9, 2019
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Media / Multimedia / Electronic media
English term or phrase: Stop press
"Stop press" is sometimes printed next to an article in a newspaper to indicate that this is very recent news and was added after the rest of the newspaper had been printed.
I was wondering if there was a similar expression more suitable for 21st century non-print media, such as online blogs and websites and things like that. All suggestions welcome.
neilmac
Spain
Local time: 16:59
Latest!
Explanation:
Another possiblity.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2019-09-09 15:10:33 GMT)
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It's what the Grauniad uses (without the exclamation mark).
Selected response from:

B D Finch
France
Local time: 16:59
Grading comment
@Björn: The query is not about "stop the presses", but the header "Stop Press", commonly used in print media to announce breaking news or the latest "hot poop". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stop_press
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +6breaking news
airmailrpl
4 +1Latest!
B D Finch


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
stop press
Latest!


Explanation:
Another possiblity.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2019-09-09 15:10:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It's what the Grauniad uses (without the exclamation mark).

B D Finch
France
Local time: 16:59
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
@Björn: The query is not about "stop the presses", but the header "Stop Press", commonly used in print media to announce breaking news or the latest "hot poop". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stop_press
Notes to answerer
Asker: Cheers, this might work.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Björn Vrooman: I'll go with yours, since I can't see how breaking fits with conferences, etc. While "stop the presses" can be used in the US, it's rare. For example, see this NYT article: https://www.nytimes.com/times-insider/2014/05/27/stop-the-pr... // See d-box.
7 hrs
  -> Thanks Björn. However, I don't see what "stop press" not being an American usage has to do with this question. It is common British usage and the Asker wants an alternative that fits their particular context.
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
stop press
breaking news


Explanation:
stop press => breaking news

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Note added at 11 mins (2019-09-09 10:43:18 GMT)
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break·ing news
noun
plural noun: breaking news

newly received information about an event that is currently occurring or developing.
"some breaking news now of a rescue situation in California"

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Note added at 7 hrs (2019-09-09 17:56:55 GMT)
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>Asker: The thing is that it's not always "news", but plugs for events like conferences, training courses, sporting competitions....

breaking news still works for those also

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 12:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
Notes to answerer
Asker: The thing is that it's not always "news", but plugs for events like conferences, training courses, sporting competitions....


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MARK ROBERTSON
3 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Sheila Wilson
12 mins
  -> thank you

agree  philgoddard: Or just 'breaking".
21 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Aline Amorim
55 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Clauwolf
7 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  AJ Ablooglu
1 day 2 hrs
  -> thank you
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