witch hazel

English translation: Astrigent hamamelis water

11:06 Oct 28, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Medical (general)
English term or phrase: witch hazel
What was the most popular formula of witch hazel used in the US for medication of burns, cuts, etc., in the 1960-s and 70-s? I mean something that people keep at home just in case. Ointment, tincture or something else? Thanks!
allp
Poland
Local time: 07:17
English translation:Astrigent hamamelis water
Explanation:
In the US, the most popular remedy is a cosmetic "formula" water, which is NOT a tincture, but can be found in most households. It has a high procentage of alcohol, and is only used externally. This would have been the case in the 60s and 70s - although ointments are also available - see website.
Selected response from:

Nancy Arrowsmith
Local time: 23:17
Grading comment
I guess that's it. Many thanks to all of you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +9Herb
Kurt Porter
4 +6witch hazel tincture
NancyLynn
4 +2Astrigent hamamelis water
Nancy Arrowsmith


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
Herb


Explanation:
Witch Hazel
Witch Hazel is an herb that makes a wonderful, cooling astringent and toner for the skin. It is made by steeping witch hazel herb leaves and/or roots in hot water or oil to create an infusion that can then be used in creams, lotions and moisturizing gels.





    Reference: http://www.body-systems.net/ingredients_dictionary.php
Kurt Porter
Local time: 10:17
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexander Taguiltsev: old fashion remedy somthing like a scrab. It could be herb. You buy it in a drugstore
42 mins
  -> Spasibo!

agree  Rachel Fell: http://www.rhs.org.uk/WhatsOn/gardens/harlowcarr/archive/har...
44 mins
  -> Thank you, Rachel.

agree  jennifer newsome (X)
56 mins
  -> Thank you, Jennifer.

agree  Jörgen Slet
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Jörgen

agree  Dave Calderhead: Sounds like the right stuff to me!
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, Dave.

neutral  NancyLynn: it certainly is an ingredient in various cosmetics (see the Hamamelis line from Yves Rocher) but in the 60s-70s, I think it was only in tincture form.
8 hrs

agree  Will Matter: Tincture or liquid in the 60s.
9 hrs
  -> Thank you, Will.

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X): yes for English English this is right; an explanation not a term!!!
10 hrs
  -> Thank you,Jane.

agree  Refugio: water-based lotion
17 hrs

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
1 day 2 hrs
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50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
witch hazel tincture


Explanation:
Available in pharmacies in a concentrated liquid form.

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 01:17
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Fell: used as an astringent lotion http://www.thefreedictionary.com/witch hazel
12 mins
  -> yes, it has healing properties for the skin

agree  Jörgen Slet
36 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Michael Barnett: I can't think of any formulation of witch hazel other than "tincture" in common use at that time.
4 hrs
  -> exactly - to answer the question. Certainly, in the past decade or so Hamamélis has become very popular as a line of shampoo, lotion etc from Yves Rocher

agree  juvera: You actually answered the question. :-) (By the way, in the UK it was more common as a cream or lotion at that time.)
8 hrs
  -> thanks :-)

agree  Will Matter
8 hrs
  -> thanks will

agree  Freimanis
18 hrs
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Astrigent hamamelis water


Explanation:
In the US, the most popular remedy is a cosmetic "formula" water, which is NOT a tincture, but can be found in most households. It has a high procentage of alcohol, and is only used externally. This would have been the case in the 60s and 70s - although ointments are also available - see website.


    Reference: http://www.paghat.com/witchhazelmedicinal.html
    Reference: http://www.wholisticresearch.com/info/artshow.php3?artid=389
Nancy Arrowsmith
Local time: 23:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
I guess that's it. Many thanks to all of you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio: There were also alcohol-free witch hazel lotions, but I agree: not a tincture as such. By the way, that's "astringent", not astrigent.
52 mins

agree  Will Matter: and "percentage", of course.
19 hrs
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