do you have nausea or did you throw up or are you sick

English translation: Just joking, I presume?

10:44 Jan 25, 2003
English to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general)
English term or phrase: do you have nausea or did you throw up or are you sick
how can I ask my patient ,simpliest way for me and for my patient aswell,if he or she has upset stomach
ufukulgen
English translation:Just joking, I presume?
Explanation:
2 weeks ago, you asked the same sentence in Eng > Ger... see http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=339762

If it's still the same patient, he should be dead right now ;o)

Moreover, this is not the first time you're asking this kind of questions, which is not very trustworthy IMO, but... all the answers are graded automatically, based on the agrees. However, KudoZ rules state that grading is compulsory. So I suggest you abide by the rules or refrain from asking questions.

Serge L.
Selected response from:

Serge L
Local time: 17:20
Grading comment
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +9Have you been vomiting?
David Knowles
5 +7It depends on what information you are trying to get.
Fuad Yahya
5 +2do you feel sick?
jerrie
5 +2Just joking, I presume?
Serge L
5Have you been sick to your stomach?
Heart


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
do you feel sick?


Explanation:
have you been sick

is probably the best Dr/Patient terminology

or do you feel nauseous?

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sarah Ponting: certainly for the UK, not sure about the US though - "do you feel sick?" could be undestood as "do you feel ill?"
13 mins
  -> Yes for US go with the 'are you nauseous'?

agree  zebung: are you nauseous
1 hr
  -> Thanks
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
Have you been vomiting?


Explanation:
There are UK/US differences here. In the UK, you could say "have you been sick?", but in the US this might mean "have you been ill?", so it's safer to say "have you been vomiting?".

"Do you feel nauseous?" is definitely US. The UK equivalent is "Do you feel sick?" The patient might say "I threw up" but the doctor would probably avoid this as too vulgar.

Doctors develop their own polite language for these things, which is neither technical nor liable to cause offence!

David Knowles
Local time: 16:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Amy Williams: probably best for UK/US. Or "any (sign of) vomiting?". Definitely NOT "did you throw up"..!
4 mins
  -> "any sign of" - good doctor-speak!

agree  Kardi Kho
11 mins

agree  EDLING (X)
29 mins

agree  HALAHouse
38 mins

agree  Sarah Ponting
1 hr

agree  NancyLynn: any sign of
1 hr

agree  Anu Mukharji-Gorski
5 hrs

agree  Tanja Abramovic (X)
1 day 15 hrs

agree  Dolly Xu
2 days 15 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
It depends on what information you are trying to get.


Explanation:
My experience as a medical interpreter is limited to 11 years at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, where chemotherapy toxicity, graft versus host disease, GI tract infections, and nutritional status need to to be assessed with precision. In such an environment, we say "nausea" when we mean "nausea" and "vomiting" when we mean vomiting. If the patient says, "I have been sick to my stomach" (a very common expression in Houston, Texas), the clinician will ask, "do you mean you have been actually vomitting, or just feeling nauseous?" Likewise, If the patient says, "I have upset stomach," the clinician will ask, "Do have stomachache, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, or something else?"

Although most clinicians avoid words like "emesis" and "antiemetic" when talking to patients, especially pediatric patients, we recognize that illness is a life experience that often entails a learning curve: the acquisition of a lot of knowledge about biology, health, disease, coping -- and a lot of vocabulary. I never knew what a radioiodine uptake was until I had hyperthyroidism.

So while it is wise to tame keep the bedside conversation at a reasonable register and not intimidate the patient with Greek and Latin, it is just as wise not to get carried away in that direction and forget the need for precision and for educating the patient about their condition. Most patients will appreciate being spoken to as adults who are capable of learning new concepts and new words if necessary.


Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-30 02:03:43 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Please forgive my typos and misspellings.

Fuad Yahya
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 54

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kardi Kho
1 hr

agree  AAAmedical
5 hrs

agree  Tanja Abramovic (X): When I was pregnant (U.S.), I was always asked: "Are you nauseous" or : "Any nausea? and "Have you been vomiting"? or: "Any vomiting?.
1 day 12 hrs

agree  kaalema: we do appreciate not being treated as idiots!
1 day 23 hrs

agree  noeliam
4 days

agree  savannah
4 days

agree  AhmedAMS
337 days
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Have you been sick to your stomach?


Explanation:
This is an American English idiom. A doctor would use this colloquial expression without sounding vulgar.'Sick' alone, in American English means simply 'ill' -ie. any kind of lack of well-being. If you wanted to be sure the patient understands, you could follow this question with the more direct "Have you experienced any nausea or vomiting?"


Heart
United States
Local time: 10:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Just joking, I presume?


Explanation:
2 weeks ago, you asked the same sentence in Eng > Ger... see http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=339762

If it's still the same patient, he should be dead right now ;o)

Moreover, this is not the first time you're asking this kind of questions, which is not very trustworthy IMO, but... all the answers are graded automatically, based on the agrees. However, KudoZ rules state that grading is compulsory. So I suggest you abide by the rules or refrain from asking questions.

Serge L.


    Reference: http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=339762
Serge L
Local time: 17:20
PRO pts in category: 1

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  luisantos (X)
14 mins

agree  Noel Castelino: Could it be that he is still trying to ascertain the language of the patient ?
1 day 8 hrs
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