weathered zone

English translation: layer of rock subjected to climatic conditions

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:weathered zone
English translation:layer of rock subjected to climatic conditions
Entered by: Erich Ekoputra

05:36 Nov 29, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Mining & Minerals / Gems / mining impact on environment
English term or phrase: weathered zone
Where the pre-mining overburden contains sulfidic material that may produce acid drainage, the surface weathered (oxidised) zone is a valuable resource and care needs to be taken to ensure that this material does not end up being buried by sulfidic rock at the end of the mining operation.
Anthony Indra
Indonesia
Local time: 10:06
soil zone subjected to climatic conditions
Explanation:
That is, the layer of the soil that can be affected by weather factors such as rain, snow, humidity, exposure to solar rays, etc. This layer can be as thick as 70 m in some cases.

See:
http://www.newmont.com/en/about/gold/glossary/index.asp
weathered zone: near surface zone in which the exposed rock has been chemically or physically changed due to the action of rain, water, etc.
Selected response from:

Erich Ekoputra
Indonesia
Local time: 10:06
Grading comment
Thank you all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1depth/area of rock affected by external forces
Clare Barnes
4 +1soil zone subjected to climatic conditions
Erich Ekoputra
4 -1zone of erosion caused by weather (by oxidation)
Vitaly Kisin


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
soil zone subjected to climatic conditions


Explanation:
That is, the layer of the soil that can be affected by weather factors such as rain, snow, humidity, exposure to solar rays, etc. This layer can be as thick as 70 m in some cases.

See:
http://www.newmont.com/en/about/gold/glossary/index.asp
weathered zone: near surface zone in which the exposed rock has been chemically or physically changed due to the action of rain, water, etc.

Erich Ekoputra
Indonesia
Local time: 10:06
Native speaker of: Native in IndonesianIndonesian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you all!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Clare Barnes: area of rock, not soil...
5 hrs
  -> Thanks for the input....

agree  juvera: Overburden is both rock or soil, and climatic conditions create the "weathered zone" .
15 hrs
  -> Thanks juvera!
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
zone of erosion caused by weather (by oxidation)


Explanation:
as the entire globe is exposed to climatic conditions, I suggest to use the term erosion

Vitaly Kisin
Local time: 04:06
Works in field
Native speaker of: Russian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Clare Barnes: weathering and erosion are not the same thing
48 mins
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
depth/area of rock affected by external forces


Explanation:
My understanding of this is that is is an area of rock that as been subjected to external forces that affect and weaken the structure of the rock e.g. frost, rain, wind, chemical processes. This takes place "in situ".

Soil is a product of such weathering - though soil can be affected by erosion, which is the removal of particles by external forces (water wind etc). Erosion is what happens when weathered particles are moved.

Weathered rock may have soil above it.

These are two separate processes - see the links below.


    Reference: http://www2.nature.nps.gov/GEOLOGY/usgsnps/misc/gweaero.html
    Reference: http://estes.on-line.com/rmnp/edu/rmnp-pew.html
Clare Barnes
Sweden
Local time: 05:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cristina Chaplin
30 mins
  -> Thanks!
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