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pls suggest a better word

English translation: struggling for life

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14:23 Dec 23, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other
English term or phrase: pls suggest a better word
A husband shot his wife in his home. His wife is fighting with death. The husband surrendered himself to police after committing this incident.

I think 'committing' feels awkward here. And it should be "fighting with death" or "fighting against death"? Could you pls suggest some other appropriate word.
xxxSanjiv Sadan
Local time: 22:39
English translation:struggling for life
Explanation:
"Fighting against death" is the more correct of your 2 suggestions, but "struggling for life" sounds more natural.

The husband committed the "act".
Selected response from:

Michael Barnett
Local time: 13:09
Grading comment
Your answers were equally great and marvellous. I thank all of you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +7The husband then surrendered himself to police.Robert Forstag
5 +5struggling for life
Michael Barnett
4 +2She is now hanging between life and death. The husband..xxxCMJ_Trans
3 +2regarding first two sentencespomiglia
5fighting death / perpetratingMurat Yildirim


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
struggling for life


Explanation:
"Fighting against death" is the more correct of your 2 suggestions, but "struggling for life" sounds more natural.

The husband committed the "act".

Michael Barnett
Local time: 13:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
Grading comment
Your answers were equally great and marvellous. I thank all of you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kirill Semenov
12 mins
  -> Thanks Kirill!

agree  stone118
3 hrs
  -> Thanks stone118!

agree  Can Altinbay
5 hrs
  -> Thanks Can!

agree  Josephine79: Yes, for some reason this sounds more natural.
7 hrs
  -> Thanks Josephine! :-)

agree  Cristina Chaplin
10 hrs
  -> Thanks Awana!

neutral  Mike Delta : Which is more graphic, a) 'His wife fights death'? b) 'His wife fights for her life'? 'He surrendered to the police after he shot her.'
23 days
  -> Neither were my suggestions. ;-)
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
fighting death / perpetrating


Explanation:
I agree with the earlier answerers, and yet make another suggestion in case you wish to consider.

Murat Yildirim
Local time: 20:09
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl: -
1 hr

disagree  Can Altinbay: Perpetrating is not appropriate here.
5 hrs
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
regarding first two sentences


Explanation:
At home, a man shot his wife. His wife struggled to stay alive.

You can't use the past tense in the 1st and 3rd sentence, and stick the present tense in the 2nd sentence when you are narrating events in chronological order. Regarding the 3rd sentence, I would go with Robert's suggestion; however, to answer your question, the use of commit is fine here, it's the use of incident that doesn't work-you need the word "crime". (...after committing the crime.)

pomiglia
United States
Local time: 11:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  stone118
3 hrs

agree  Elisabete Cunha: I agree with "commiting the crime"
4 hrs

neutral  Josephine79: I think you have misunderstood the meaning. It's not that she struggled for her life before he shot her, it's that she is at present fighting for her life after having been shot. Which explains why Sanjiv has used the present tense.
7 hrs
  -> Yes; he shot her, she struggled, he surrendered. The 2nd sentence must be in the past tense because the following sentence (the 3rd sentence) is in the past tense. You could say: while his wife was struggling, he surrendered
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
The husband then surrendered himself to police.


Explanation:
OR:

Shortly afterward, the husband surrendered himself to police.

You don't need to use "commit" or any synonym thereof. What he did has already been explained.

Best regards.

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Note added at 15 mins (2005-12-23 14:38:58 GMT)
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For the second phrase, I would go with:

His wife lay daying.

OR

His wife lay fighting for her life.

I have to say, though, that I really think "fighting for one's life" is an overblown phrase, and inappropriate except in cases where someone is actually making active efforts to preserve one's life (e.g., The man was cornered by three hoodlums in the street alley and found himself fighting for his life....

Robert Forstag
United States
Local time: 13:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kathi Stock
4 mins
  -> Thank you, Kathi.

neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: to THE police - you need the article - well you may not in the US but in the UK it is wrong without the article! - It never crossed my mind this was another americanism - sorry but if I put an article you'll say I'm wrong. He didn't say US either
11 mins
  -> Well, Sanjiv did not specify he was writing for a UK market (I wish people would do this). Thus, it is improper to cast aspersions on my response. ;-D

agree  Kirill Semenov
12 mins
  -> Thank you, Kirill.

agree  pomiglia: I agree with the suggestion for the 3rd sentence.
16 mins
  -> Thank you, Pomi.

neutral  Michael Barnett: "Lay dying" sounds like a foregone conclusion! The other suggestions are fine. ;-)//We'll have to disagree on that. What does the "crowd" think? Regards!
21 mins
  -> I think "lay dying" describes the reality much better than "struggling for life". It doesn't mean that she *will* die. If you think about the physical reality of what is actually going on, "lay dying" is really more descriptively accurate, IMO.

agree  Peter Shortall: agree with "fighting for her life". It could even be in the present tense - she may still be, even though her husband has now given himself up. I don't think it's overblown, and I frequently hear it used regarding people unconscious in hospital.
44 mins
  -> Thank you, Peter. I frequently hear it as well. I just don't particularly care for it. Happy Holidays.

agree  Alp Berker
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Alp.

agree  stone118: Interesting..., I agree with all your suggestions here. : )
3 hrs

neutral  Josephine79: To add my twopenn'th: fighting for her life sounds exactly right to me - even if she is unconscious her body's defence mechanisms are struggling to keep her alive. And lay dying definitely sounds like a foregone conclusion. Only use if the person died.
7 hrs

agree  Trudy Peters: I would just say "surrendered to police" (US). Also agree with Michael.
9 hrs
  -> Thank you, Trudy.
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
She is now hanging between life and death. The husband..


Explanation:
subsequently gave himself up to the police

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 19:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 48

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elisabete Cunha
4 hrs

agree  Can Altinbay
5 hrs

neutral  Mike Delta : 'She hangs between life and death' perhaps, but does it tell me that 'she ain't gonna die if she can help it'.
23 days
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