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Hallel

English translation: Hallel --> Praise (Hallelu - Jah --> Praise be to God)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Hallel
English translation:Hallel --> Praise (Hallelu - Jah --> Praise be to God)
Entered by: flaviofbg
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09:45 Jan 3, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Hallel
Hallel from the Great Hallel, which is comprised of Psalms 113 - 118 which was sung by The Lord before crossing the brook Kidron. Bible reference Matthew 26 v 30
Michael
Hallel --> Praise (Hallelu - Jah --> Praise be to God)
Explanation:
Hope you find this interesting and helpful.
***


Hallel - "Praise of G-d"



Hallel consists of six Psalms (113-118), which are said as a unit, on joyous occasions, when the praise of G-d is particularly appropriate, immediately following the Shacharit "Shemoneh Esray." These occasions include the following:

The three "major" festivals, Pesach, Shavuot and Sukkot, the term "major" meaning that the festival is mentioned in the "Chamishei Chumshei Torah," the Five Books of Moses

The "minor" festival, Chanukah, the term "minor" meaning that the festival is not mentioned in the Five Books of Moses, and was instituted at a later time in Jewish History, either by the members of the "Anshei K'nesset Hagedolah," the "Men of the Great Assembly," or by great Jewish leaders acting under the influence of the Divine Spirit

Rosh Chodesh (Beginnings of New Months).
These chapters are expressions of joy and faith in G-d, and of gratitude for salvation from our enemies. They were incorporated into the Book of Psalms by King David, and they were singled out for inclusion in Hallel because they contain the following fundamental themes of the faith of Judaism: the Exodus, the Giving of the Torah by G-d at Sinai, the future Resurrection of the Dead, and the Coming of the Mashiach.

On Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, Hallel is not said at all, because as the Talmud explains in Masechet Arachin 10b, "Is it seemly for the king to be sitting on His Throne of Judgment, with the Books of Life and Death open before Him, and for the people to sing joyful praises to him?"

On the various Festivals, Hallel is said in one of two forms: Full Hallel and Partial Hallel.

Full Hallel, that is, all six Psalms, in their entirety, is recited on all nine days of Sukkot (including the "eighth" and "ninth" days, Shmini Atzeret and Simchat Torah), on Shavuot, on the first two days of Pesach, and on Chanukah.

Partial Hallel, which does not include verses 1-11 of Psalm 115, nor those verses from Psalm 116, is recited on the last six days of Pesach and on Rosh Chodesh. See immediately below for explanation of two day - six day split on Pesach.

Pesach, like Sukkot, has the structure of Main Holiday (two days, one in Israel), followed by Intermediate Days (four days, five in Israel), followed by Main Holiday (again, two days, one in Israel). The last two days of Main Holiday (the Seventh day, in Israel) are specifically related to the Miracle of the Crossing of the Sea of Reeds, in which the entire Egyptian army was drowned. G-d Himself declared a limitation on our expression of His praise at that time, when He said "My creatures are drowning in the sea; it is not a time for the full expression of joy." Because the Intermediate Days should not be more joyous than the Main Holiday, it was decided that only Partial Hallel would be recited on all of the last six days of Pesach.

Only the Partial Hallel is recited on Rosh Chodesh, because it was introduced at a much later time than the other Rabbinic festivals; that is, in Babylonia, in late Talmudic times. Therefore, it originally had the character only of a "minhag," or custom.

No Hallel, neither Full nor Partial, is recited on Purim, despite the fact that there occurred at that time a miraculous salvation, albeit by a "hidden" miracle, aided by the valiant actions of Mordechai and Esther, from a premeditated full-scale attack on the Jewish People, by Haman and his cohorts, for several reasons. Two of those reasons are the following:

The miracle did not occur in the Land of Israel and, for "minor" holidays, only those occurring in Israel merit the recitation of Hallel.

Even after the Miracle of Purim, the Jews remained subjects of the Persian Empire, whereas on Chanukah, as a result of the victory of the Chashmonaim, the Jews regained their independence from Greece, at least for a short while (historically speaking), before they would fall again, this time under the domination of Rome.
Selected response from:

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 08:09
Grading comment
Thank you. Very helpful. Now, if I could ask how to pronounce it, that would be a bonus.... :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Hallel --> Praise (Hallelu - Jah --> Praise be to God)
flaviofbg
5hal-lelJohn Kinory
4Give Flavio the points
athena22
4Pronunciation...
flaviofbg


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Hallel --> Praise (Hallelu - Jah --> Praise be to God)


Explanation:
Hope you find this interesting and helpful.
***


Hallel - "Praise of G-d"



Hallel consists of six Psalms (113-118), which are said as a unit, on joyous occasions, when the praise of G-d is particularly appropriate, immediately following the Shacharit "Shemoneh Esray." These occasions include the following:

The three "major" festivals, Pesach, Shavuot and Sukkot, the term "major" meaning that the festival is mentioned in the "Chamishei Chumshei Torah," the Five Books of Moses

The "minor" festival, Chanukah, the term "minor" meaning that the festival is not mentioned in the Five Books of Moses, and was instituted at a later time in Jewish History, either by the members of the "Anshei K'nesset Hagedolah," the "Men of the Great Assembly," or by great Jewish leaders acting under the influence of the Divine Spirit

Rosh Chodesh (Beginnings of New Months).
These chapters are expressions of joy and faith in G-d, and of gratitude for salvation from our enemies. They were incorporated into the Book of Psalms by King David, and they were singled out for inclusion in Hallel because they contain the following fundamental themes of the faith of Judaism: the Exodus, the Giving of the Torah by G-d at Sinai, the future Resurrection of the Dead, and the Coming of the Mashiach.

On Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, Hallel is not said at all, because as the Talmud explains in Masechet Arachin 10b, "Is it seemly for the king to be sitting on His Throne of Judgment, with the Books of Life and Death open before Him, and for the people to sing joyful praises to him?"

On the various Festivals, Hallel is said in one of two forms: Full Hallel and Partial Hallel.

Full Hallel, that is, all six Psalms, in their entirety, is recited on all nine days of Sukkot (including the "eighth" and "ninth" days, Shmini Atzeret and Simchat Torah), on Shavuot, on the first two days of Pesach, and on Chanukah.

Partial Hallel, which does not include verses 1-11 of Psalm 115, nor those verses from Psalm 116, is recited on the last six days of Pesach and on Rosh Chodesh. See immediately below for explanation of two day - six day split on Pesach.

Pesach, like Sukkot, has the structure of Main Holiday (two days, one in Israel), followed by Intermediate Days (four days, five in Israel), followed by Main Holiday (again, two days, one in Israel). The last two days of Main Holiday (the Seventh day, in Israel) are specifically related to the Miracle of the Crossing of the Sea of Reeds, in which the entire Egyptian army was drowned. G-d Himself declared a limitation on our expression of His praise at that time, when He said "My creatures are drowning in the sea; it is not a time for the full expression of joy." Because the Intermediate Days should not be more joyous than the Main Holiday, it was decided that only Partial Hallel would be recited on all of the last six days of Pesach.

Only the Partial Hallel is recited on Rosh Chodesh, because it was introduced at a much later time than the other Rabbinic festivals; that is, in Babylonia, in late Talmudic times. Therefore, it originally had the character only of a "minhag," or custom.

No Hallel, neither Full nor Partial, is recited on Purim, despite the fact that there occurred at that time a miraculous salvation, albeit by a "hidden" miracle, aided by the valiant actions of Mordechai and Esther, from a premeditated full-scale attack on the Jewish People, by Haman and his cohorts, for several reasons. Two of those reasons are the following:

The miracle did not occur in the Land of Israel and, for "minor" holidays, only those occurring in Israel merit the recitation of Hallel.

Even after the Miracle of Purim, the Jews remained subjects of the Persian Empire, whereas on Chanukah, as a result of the victory of the Chashmonaim, the Jews regained their independence from Greece, at least for a short while (historically speaking), before they would fall again, this time under the domination of Rome.



    Bible Gateway
    Reference: http://www.google.com
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 08:09
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
Grading comment
Thank you. Very helpful. Now, if I could ask how to pronounce it, that would be a bonus.... :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gayle Wallimann
1 hr

agree  Sarah Brenchley
6 hrs

agree  athena22: Wow! Very thorough. Here's a short reference that also talks about v 26:30
22 hrs
  -> Thanks Athena!! THe link proves most useful :) THanks again and happy new year!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Give Flavio the points


Explanation:
for his terrific answer. Here's the reference that didn't copy into my comment above:
http://www.studylight.org/enc/isb/view.cgi?number=T4029


    Reference: http://www.studylight.org/enc/isb/view.cgi?number=T4029
athena22
United States
Local time: 23:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 32
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Pronunciation...


Explanation:
If memory serves, that would be

Hahl - L

The first vowel should be quite aspirated and not too open.

The "L" is just as if you were saying the alphabet and saying "J K I L...".
"Ehl".

Please correct me anyone if I am wrong.

Flavio



flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 08:09
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
hal-lel


Explanation:
The first L is effectively doubled (it has a dagesh/emphasis in it). Hal is short and hard, lel is the stressed syllable so is marginally longer).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-05 01:52:35 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

And of course, the question is not Eng>Eng but Hebrew>Hebrew :-)


    Native Hebrew speaker and translator.
John Kinory
Local time: 07:09
PRO pts in pair: 48
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