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palaver

English translation: palaver

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21:58 Jan 22, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
/ Etymology
English term or phrase: palaver
I have been told that palavar or palaver is a french word meaning "a meeting of the minds". Is this correct?
bk weber
English translation:palaver
Explanation:
Actually, palaver comes from the Portuguese palavra (a council of African chiefs) and isn't a French word to my knowledge.

French native speaker

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Note added at 2002-01-22 22:11:39 (GMT)
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See also:
http://www.dictionary.com/wordoftheday/archive/2000/08/23.ht...
Selected response from:

VBaby
Local time: 05:08
Grading comment
Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1des palabres
irat56
5portuguese "palavra", sailor's early 18th century slang - metathesis of Latin parabola
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4 +1parabola - parable, speech
Maya Jurt
5palaverGregory Charles Brent
4 +1palaver
VBaby


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
palaver


Explanation:
Actually, palaver comes from the Portuguese palavra (a council of African chiefs) and isn't a French word to my knowledge.

French native speaker

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-22 22:11:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

See also:
http://www.dictionary.com/wordoftheday/archive/2000/08/23.ht...


    Reference: http://www.bartleby.com/81/12668.html
    Reference: http://www.whatapalaver.com/wapdef.html
VBaby
Local time: 05:08
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
Grading comment
Thank you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt: yes, but the origin is latin.
1 min
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
palaver


Explanation:
"Palaver" comes from the Spanish "palabra," or "word." Originally, it meant "talk" in the sense of blahblahblah, i.e., something you don't really understand, "I listened to his palaver," or "Quit your palavering." It took on another sense later -- to palaver, or to confer, meet for discussion, as in " . . . go to a palaver."

Gregory Charles Brent
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
parabola - parable, speech


Explanation:
No, the word derives from the latin parabola, which means parable, speech. It means a long parley, usually between persons of different level of culture and sophistication.

Conferences or discussions can be called palaver. In this case, it means idle talk, or a misleading or beguiling speech.

In French, it is : palavre.


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Note added at 2002-01-22 22:26:20 (GMT)
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I must apaologize: I just wrote to Cecilia\'s comment, that \"negotiate\" could be the \"American-Indian\" interpretation. I meant of course the American interpretation of the Indian sense of negotiation. That is why I did not mention it. I do not think Sitting Bull and all the others would have called their negotiations with the American government \"palavers\".

Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 06:08
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 19

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Parrot: And the older meaning in English was "palaver" (negotiate).
7 mins
  -> Isn't that the American-Indian interpretation?
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38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
des palabres


Explanation:
Directly from palavera. The meeting of chiefs is often referred to as "des palabres" (most generally if ever plural)

irat56
France
Local time: 06:08
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DPolice
7 hrs
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56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
portuguese "palavra", sailor's early 18th century slang - metathesis of Latin parabola


Explanation:
http://www.geocities.com/etymonline/p1etym.htm

palaver - 1735, sailors' slang, from Port. palavra "word, speech, talk," traders' term for "negotiating with the natives" in W.Africa, metathesis of L.L. parabola "speech, discourse," from L. parabola "comparison." Meaning "idle talk" first recorded 1748.


http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary

Main Entry: 1pa·lav·er
Pronunciation: p&-'la-v&r, -'lä-
Function: noun
Etymology: Portuguese palavra word, speech, from Late Latin parabola parable, speech
Date: 1735
1 a : a long parley usually between persons of different cultures or levels of sophistication b : CONFERENCE, DISCUSSION
2 a : idle talk b : misleading or beguiling speech


http://www.wordwizard.com/slangstreet/showslang.asp?Street=T...

palaver < Pg palavra = word, speech, talk < LL parabola = parable





Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 06:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 26
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