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Use "do" or "make"

English translation: See explanation

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Use
English translation:See explanation
Entered by: Kim Metzger
Options:
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18:35 Mar 18, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Use "do" or "make"
Rewrite both sentences correctly using 'do' or 'make'

Example
[Using 'do']
Example 1. She gets good mark at art =
She does good mark at art.
[Using 'make']
Example 2. I've decided to leave my job = I've made a decisiion to leave my job.

End of example, here are both sentences that need conversion by using "do" or "make" (select either 'do' or 'make' that suitable for each sentence , no need to use both of it.)

1. We buy everything we need in the new supermarket.

2. It only takes me a second to tidy my room.

It would be very easy for you native speaker, so please help.
P.S. It looks like a child homework but sadly it's my translation job.
PTS
See explanation
Explanation:
1. We do all our shopping at the new shopping market. We make all our purchases at the supermarket.
2. It only takes me a second to make my room tidy. It only takes me a second to do my room.
Explantion:
a. Do is used for talking about work and jobs. - Do the shopping, do the room, do the ironing.
b. Make is used in fixed expressions. Make an offer, make a purchase, make arrangements.
c. Make can be followed by an object with an adjective or a noun referring to a change in the object. The rain made the grass wet. I made my room tidy.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-18 23:31:23 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

She does good marks in art is not a proper English sentence. She does well in art. She gets good marks.
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:33
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6See explanation
Kim Metzger
5 +4Leave them as they are.Michael Sebold
5 +11. We make all our purchases of everything we need in the new supermarket.
Marian Greenfield
4 +2We do all our shopping at the new supermarket.
Margaret Lagoyianni
4 -1It takes me only a second to do my room.Tatiana Neroni


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
1. We make all our purchases of everything we need in the new supermarket.


Explanation:
It only takes me a second to make my room tidy.

Marian Greenfield
Local time: 13:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 732

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ingot
1 min

agree  Rafa Lombardino
4 mins

agree  Tatiana Neroni: Absolutely.
7 mins

disagree  Michael Sebold: I'm sorry, Marian, but "all our purchases of everything we need" is redundant; it makes the sentence longer than necessary (MHO).
19 mins

disagree  John Kinory: I have to agree with Michael
6 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
It takes me only a second to do my room.


Explanation:
As an English teacher, I understand that if 2 sentences were given and two verbs, probably, they wanted the students to use both, in the above answer only "make" is used for the second sentence, so I used the second verb "to do".



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-19 03:37:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Risking to raise even more hell from native-speakers, I will dare to insist (for the sake of the Asker only - since the purpose of this forum is to help the Asker, not to set scores for whatever reason) that \"to do my room\" is normal literate English.

I hear it every day when my American-born as-native-speaker-as-it-comes husband says to our daughter - \"you have no choice, go do you room\".

I\'ve heard it on numerous occasions from mothers of my child\'s classmates, all of them American native speakers, in discussion of the same matter - how messy the child is, how often he/she \"does his/her room\"... They will be very surprised if (no, now it\'s actually \"when\") I tell them that the English they use is non-existent.

When somebody attacks me just for something which is written in my profile (that my native language is not English), I can tell that person that I think 100 times before I put something as an answer to an \"English monolingual\" question and run it by not one, but numerous native-speakers, fully understanding that I might have good knowledge of the language, but not the \"feeling\" which comes only of being born into this language.

If any one of you didn\'t hear the above expression before, I can assure you that generally speaking, you haven\'t heard many more expressions floating around in your own native tongue, and this is perfectly normal, nobody can know everything.

But what is NOT normal is the wish to put a stopper on anybody who is not the \"aborigene\" of your language and proclaim that since you\'re native speakers, you hold the \"absolute truth\" about the language you speak - in all aspects, always... In all honesty, you do not.

The rules of communication - \"Do unto others...\"

If people are polite with me, I\'m polite.

I\'m a peace-maker by nature and those who are familiar with my peer-grading and answers, will testify to that. And I\'m not rude, too.

But I refuse to be considered \"second-class\" and to not have a right to answer to unjust and impolite criticism in a manner it deserves - using irony, too. All I said is that if a person accusing me of being illiterate is correct, then my husband is illiterate, and all those mothers at school need to redefine how they speak English.

My answer to this unfortunate peer-grading is actually a valid argument based on the accusation that was made against me, no rudeness, no patronizing whatsoever. None. It\'s not there. The only way it can be considered rude or patronizing is if I\'m not considered an equal professional, but only a second-class something not having a right to answer to criticism. This I refuse to accept.

Best of luck to everybody and apologies to the Asker for having to witness all of this.

Tatiana Neroni
PRO pts in pair: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Sue Goldian: "Do a room" is not English.
18 mins
  -> Then all my American-born family members with university degrees (lawyers mainly) are illiterate... They use it. Like saying to the child "go do your room" = "go tidy up your room". Native speakers don't see anything un-English about it and use it...

neutral  John Kinory: Never mind about the English: your reply to Sue is rude and patronising. Lawyers and university degrees are irrelevant here
6 hrs
  -> How can I possibly patronize the patronizer?

disagree  Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO): No one says that - "false memories", eh?
7 hrs
  -> Never say never. Native speaker is not an award and does not presuppose absolute knowledge of everything, you know...

agree  xxxxeni: Tatiana, I guess it is just that your irony was lost upon peers... That happens and has nothing to do with the language.
1 day27 mins
  -> That's correct, Ksenia... The whole point was the arbitrarines of the first peer-grading. Not "I never heard it used", but "is not English" - like the final judgement. There is criticism and criticism...
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Leave them as they are.


Explanation:
Unless you absolutely need to use either "do" or "make," I would leave these sentences as they are.

(One correction for the first sentence - replace "in" with "at," - "We buy everything we need at the new supermarket."




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-18 19:24:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Looking at this whole thing again, I agree with Marian\'s second sentence. For the first sentence, I would do this:
\"We do all of our shopping at the new supermarket.\"


Michael Sebold
Canada
Local time: 13:33
PRO pts in pair: 10

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tatiana Neroni: I fully agree with you, but sometimes we have no choice since our proof-readers (agencies) have the upper hand in such decisions and we depend on them for our work. It's not a mistake to use "do" or "make", although original sentences might be better...
8 mins
  -> Thank you - point taken.

agree  Jack Doughty: This looks to me like some non-native-English-speaker at an agency trying to impose rules for a language he/she does not understand. Both the "before2 and "after" versions of Example 1 \re bad English.
57 mins
  -> Thanks, Jack.

agree  John Kinory: Fully agree with Jack. And 'She does good mark at art' is not English by any stretch of the imagination.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, John.

agree  Margaret Lagoyianni: She does well at art
22 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
See explanation


Explanation:
1. We do all our shopping at the new shopping market. We make all our purchases at the supermarket.
2. It only takes me a second to make my room tidy. It only takes me a second to do my room.
Explantion:
a. Do is used for talking about work and jobs. - Do the shopping, do the room, do the ironing.
b. Make is used in fixed expressions. Make an offer, make a purchase, make arrangements.
c. Make can be followed by an object with an adjective or a noun referring to a change in the object. The rain made the grass wet. I made my room tidy.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-18 23:31:23 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

She does good marks in art is not a proper English sentence. She does well in art. She gets good marks.


    Practical English Usage - Michael Swan
Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Sebold: Great explanation.
36 mins

neutral  Berni Armstrong: While I like 1A - 1B grates on my native ears. 2A grates - but 2b sounds fine. I notice everyone has avoided the "art" example. Can anyone suggest a make or a do with that one? Not me...
1 hr
  -> Yes, make purchases at the supermarket is bad. I guess you make purchases online, for example.

agree  John Kinory: Make purchases at the hardware shop is fine (in BE), though I agree that the supermarket one sounds odd.
5 hrs

agree  xxxivw
11 hrs

agree  Gayle Wallimann: In US we can say: She makes good grades in art, but not "makes good marks". The verb "get" is more usual for both marks and grades.
11 hrs

agree  Peter Skipp
15 hrs

agree  Tatiana Neroni: Kim, I agree, and my separate "thank you" for "do the room".
23 hrs
  -> Yes, Americans, at least, tell children to do the dishes, do their homework or do their rooms.
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23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
We do all our shopping at the new supermarket.


Explanation:
We do all our shopping at the new supermarket.
I can do my room in a second.

This is correct colloquial English English.

Margaret Lagoyianni
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:33
PRO pts in pair: 9

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Kinory: Do you mean British English? If so, then yes indeed.
1 hr
  -> Thanks for the correction John

agree  Tatiana Neroni
1 hr
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