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retained resources person

English translation: retained resources

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:retained resources person
English translation:retained resources
Entered by: Chris Rowson
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22:10 Mar 28, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
/ developmental co-operation
English term or phrase: retained resources person
the whole sentence in a table of the plans of an NGO:
Look for possible financial support to engage a retained resources person for xxx/yyy/zzz to support them in analysing / identifying and preparing suitable responses to the impact of EU agricultural trade policies. I nearly thought I have a clue what they mean to say, but then the construction of the whole sentence is rather unclear to me; could it be, that gramatically the sentence really starts at 'to engage ...' and the first 5 words are only an introduction?
(xxx/yyy/zzz are social organisations in Namibia)
(I asked this already uder two bilingual headings, but didn't get really convinced up to now (no references). Therefor I dare to ask here again.)
Thanks,

Elisabeth
Elisabeth Ghysels
Local time: 07:49
retained resources
Explanation:
"Retained resources" is actually a standard phrase in British English, or in fact two, since there are two quite separate usages. The one applicable here is, however, fairly old-fashioned. This is why the best reference I could find comes from the legal environment.

The use of this phrase makes a specific differentiation from employees or possible members of an association: it refers to people who are hired on a retainer basis (as are the counsel in the reference), as opposed to people who are employees or perhaps members of an association, or are for any other reason available (volunteer?).

Among the characteristics of retained resources people are 1) that they tend to be expensive, 2) that they are temporary. They are expensive because they are experts, and also because they are temporary.

A retainer is money paid to an expert, (particularly a lawyer, to help you. There is no employment relationship. You can often terminate the retainer replationship whenever you want. Often the services paid for are not specific. I once was on retainer as a consultant: I just had to make myself useful to the client - useful enough that he would keep payng for it.

The grammar is clear to me, on the assumption that it is in a list. This makes sense in the context that it is "in a table of plans". "Look" is an imperative: the plan is to look for financial support for retaining someone.

The first five words constitute the main clause. They are followed by the dependent clause "to engage ..." - what is to be looked for. It starts to become unclear with "to support ...", a sub-dependent clause, which then goes into a few "-ing"s.

Précis: Try and find some money to hire someone to help them understand the implications ....
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 07:49
Grading comment
great help, thanks; thanks to all for their effort.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2Sounds OK to me...
Roddy Tannahill
5author's native tongue is not EnglishMichael Sebold
4retained resourcesChris Rowson
4explanation:Sandra Schlatter
2 +2administrator/ombudsman/manager ...for retained (or, reserved) resources or funds
Terry Burgess
4retained consultant
R. A. Stegemann


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Sounds OK to me...


Explanation:
Hi Elisabeth, I'm not entirely sure what the problem is here. The English is a bit "wordy", but technically it seems OK to me. Presumably the "Look for possible financial support" is under a heading of 'objectives' or something like that? The "to engage a retained resources person for xxx/yyy/zzz to support them in analysing / identifying and preparing suitable responses to the impact of EU agricultural trade policies" is a perfectly acceptable follow-on from the 'look for....' bit. Maybe I'm missing the point entirely here....if so, please tell me to keep my nose on my own face and I'll butt out ;o)

Roddy Tannahill
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:49
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt: The problem is the translation, not the understanding.
6 mins

agree  R. A. Stegemann: I too find nothing grammatically wrong with the sentence, but the notion of a resources person (retained or not) seems poorly contrued here.
1 hr
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
administrator/ombudsman/manager ...for retained (or, reserved) resources or funds


Explanation:
This is about all I can suggest.
Luck!
terry


    Exp.
Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 00:49
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 119

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt: yes, retained to do a certain job (manager)
8 mins
  -> Thank you Maya:-)))

agree  edlih_be: or retained resources manager
2 hrs
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
explanation:


Explanation:
This is how I understand the sentence:

(It is not actually a complete sentence but a fragment- the subject is missing, presumably an item on a to-do-list or list of objectives, as someone else already suggested)

[somebody/the organisation...] needs to find money ("look for financial support"), (maybe some form of ongoing sponsorship?, but that's of course speculation).
With this money, the organisation will be able to recruit a new permanent employee for xxx etc. ("to engage ...").
This employee will help them (i.e. xxx etc.) in analysing... preparing ...- that's basically the job description.

Makes sense to me and fits grammatically.

Sandra Schlatter
Local time: 06:49
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Maya Jurt: not permanent (see retain)
4 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
retained consultant


Explanation:
It may be that the author wishes to avoid this term, because there are people who serve as "resource persons" who are not professional consultants.

The president of a university that serves on a government committee to investigate a particular problem for example is hardly a consultant even though she is retained.

On the other hand, the job of a consultant is to identify problems, provide analysis, and recommend solutions.


R. A. Stegemann
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 14:49
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 132
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
author's native tongue is not English


Explanation:
"Engage" and "retained" are redundant here. The intent, as I read it, is to secure funding in order to retain a person who will serve as a resource to xxx/yyy/zzz in their analysis, etc. I think they are attempting to stress that this person will be "retained" for this work on an as-needed basis.




Michael Sebold
Canada
Local time: 01:49
PRO pts in pair: 10
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
retained resources


Explanation:
"Retained resources" is actually a standard phrase in British English, or in fact two, since there are two quite separate usages. The one applicable here is, however, fairly old-fashioned. This is why the best reference I could find comes from the legal environment.

The use of this phrase makes a specific differentiation from employees or possible members of an association: it refers to people who are hired on a retainer basis (as are the counsel in the reference), as opposed to people who are employees or perhaps members of an association, or are for any other reason available (volunteer?).

Among the characteristics of retained resources people are 1) that they tend to be expensive, 2) that they are temporary. They are expensive because they are experts, and also because they are temporary.

A retainer is money paid to an expert, (particularly a lawyer, to help you. There is no employment relationship. You can often terminate the retainer replationship whenever you want. Often the services paid for are not specific. I once was on retainer as a consultant: I just had to make myself useful to the client - useful enough that he would keep payng for it.

The grammar is clear to me, on the assumption that it is in a list. This makes sense in the context that it is "in a table of plans". "Look" is an imperative: the plan is to look for financial support for retaining someone.

The first five words constitute the main clause. They are followed by the dependent clause "to engage ..." - what is to be looked for. It starts to become unclear with "to support ...", a sub-dependent clause, which then goes into a few "-ing"s.

Précis: Try and find some money to hire someone to help them understand the implications ....



    Reference: http://www.ssa-lawtech.com/wp/wp2-6.htm
Chris Rowson
Local time: 07:49
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 243
Grading comment
great help, thanks; thanks to all for their effort.
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