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misleading sentence??

English translation: yes, agree with you, it is misleading, ought to be more like....

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22:52 Dec 28, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: misleading sentence??
Hi, guys. I'd like your opinion about this. Isn't the sentence between ** a bit misleading? It looks like it's the employees who may be continued instead of the benefits, am I right?
**Employees with Insurance benefits may be continued temporarily at their own expense.** The Federal Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) provides employees and their qualified beneficiaries the opportunity to temporarily continue pre-existing health insurance coverage under the employer’s plan.
Vanina Ricciardelli
Argentina
Local time: 00:30
English translation:yes, agree with you, it is misleading, ought to be more like....
Explanation:
insurance coverage may be continued temporarely at (former) employees' own
cost
Selected response from:

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 05:30
Grading comment
Thank you guys!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +5Misleading or not, this is a common wording of this kind of material.Fuad Yahya
5 +4Not misleading at all. A natural (though unpleasant evolution of English)Peter Coles
4 +3yes, agree with you, it is misleading, ought to be more like....
swisstell
5a "bit misleading" I think is a gross understatement!!!
Terry Burgess
4You're right
Kim Metzger
3YesNancy Arrowsmith


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
yes, agree with you, it is misleading, ought to be more like....


Explanation:
insurance coverage may be continued temporarely at (former) employees' own
cost


swisstell
Italy
Local time: 05:30
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 170
Grading comment
Thank you guys!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Terry Burgess: Definitely!...and Happy 2003 to you!:)
2 mins
  -> thanks, Terry and a great 2003 to you !

agree  mónica alfonso
2 hrs
  -> gracias y Feliz Año Nuevo !

agree  Dolly Xu
1 day15 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
a "bit misleading" I think is a gross understatement!!!


Explanation:
Hi Vanina!
Unbelievable!...or perhaps not so much so!

Anyway, I'm fully convinced they're referring to the benefits, rather than the employees.
Luck!
terry


    NN
Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 22:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 119
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Yes


Explanation:
Insurance benefits of employees may be...
would be the right way to phrase it.

Nancy Arrowsmith
Local time: 21:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 60
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
You're right


Explanation:
It does look like it's the employees who may be continued instead of the benefits. I'd say it's a poorly written sentence. I might rewrite the problem sentence this way: Employees may continue their insurance benefits temporarily at their own expense.


Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 22:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Not misleading at all. A natural (though unpleasant evolution of English)


Explanation:
I've seen this type of construction creeping more and more into English. It looks to me like a contraction of "Employees with Insurance benefits may be continued (in this position) temporarily at their own expense".

Before everybody howls. I neither endorse nor like this evolution. I think that it's extremely inelegant, and not the sort of thing that those of us who use words professionally would ever use. But we'd be kidding ourselves if we pretended that it wasn't happening.



Peter Coles
Local time: 04:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 47

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yuri Geifman
1 hr

agree  Chris Rowson
2 hrs

agree  Susana Galilea
7 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
1 day22 hrs
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Misleading or not, this is a common wording of this kind of material.


Explanation:
Employees are continued in the sense of being allowed to continue receiving the benefits. Not the most intuitive wording, but common.


Fuad

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 893

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yuri Geifman
1 hr

agree  Chris Rowson: When the Greeks and Romans make slippery language like this, we give it fancy names and consider it literary (e.g. synecdoche), but this takes a few hundred years.
2 hrs

agree  Susana Galilea
7 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
1 day22 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
9 days
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