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imperial / imperialistic

English translation: they are quite different ...

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:imperial / imperialistic
English translation:they are quite different ...
Entered by: Chris Rowson
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07:33 Jan 21, 2003
English to English translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: imperial / imperialistic
Could someone tell me the difference between imperial and imperialistic? The author always uses imperial (imp. age, functions, power). Could "imperial" also be translated as "imperialistisch" into German or does it have to be "imperial" (i.e. imperiales Zeitalter)?
ibz
Local time: 13:50
they are quite different ...
Explanation:
Imperial means relating to an emperor or an empire. Translating it to German, it can be "kaiserliche", or it may be a formation with "Reich", but not "imperialistisch".

"Imperialistic" means having to do with imperialism, a more modern concept.

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Note added at 2003-01-21 07:44:45 (GMT)
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\"It is this economic condition of affairs that forms the taproot of Imperialism.\" - from http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1902hobson.html

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Note added at 2003-01-21 07:59:27 (GMT)
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Relating the terms to the Romans of classical antiquity, you can actually describe the Roman state as having behaved imperialistically long before they actually had emperors. Thus the phrase \"imperial Rome\" refers specifically to the period from the institution of Augustus as emperor in 27 B.C. But \"imperialistic Rome\" means Rome during the period that it behaved imperialistically, from around 300 B.C., if not earlier, until it failed, around the fourth century C.E.

I am basing this on the explanation of imperialism given in the reference above, John Hobson´s book \"Imperialism\" pubished in 1948.

\"A nation may either, following the example of Denmark or Switzerland, put brains into agriculture, develop a finely varied system of public education, general and technical, apply the ripest science to its special manufacturing industries, and so support in progressive comfort and character a considerable population upon a strictly limited area; or it may, like Great r Britain, neglect its agriculture, allowing its lands to go out of cultivation and its population to grow up in towns, fall behind other nations in its methods of education and in the capacity of adapting to its uses the latest scientific knowledge, in order that it may squander its pecuniary and military resources in forcing bad markets and finding speculative fields of investment in distant corners of the earth, adding millions of square miles and of unassimilable population to the area of the Empire.\"
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 13:50
Grading comment
Thank you for your very extensive answer!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +12they are quite different ...
Chris Rowson
5IMPERIALES ZEITALTER aber IMPERIALISTISCHE WELTANSCHAUUNG etc etc
xxxIno66
4 +1Basically imperial is nice to neutral: imperialistic is...
Arthur Borges


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +12
they are quite different ...


Explanation:
Imperial means relating to an emperor or an empire. Translating it to German, it can be "kaiserliche", or it may be a formation with "Reich", but not "imperialistisch".

"Imperialistic" means having to do with imperialism, a more modern concept.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-21 07:44:45 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"It is this economic condition of affairs that forms the taproot of Imperialism.\" - from http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1902hobson.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-21 07:59:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Relating the terms to the Romans of classical antiquity, you can actually describe the Roman state as having behaved imperialistically long before they actually had emperors. Thus the phrase \"imperial Rome\" refers specifically to the period from the institution of Augustus as emperor in 27 B.C. But \"imperialistic Rome\" means Rome during the period that it behaved imperialistically, from around 300 B.C., if not earlier, until it failed, around the fourth century C.E.

I am basing this on the explanation of imperialism given in the reference above, John Hobson´s book \"Imperialism\" pubished in 1948.

\"A nation may either, following the example of Denmark or Switzerland, put brains into agriculture, develop a finely varied system of public education, general and technical, apply the ripest science to its special manufacturing industries, and so support in progressive comfort and character a considerable population upon a strictly limited area; or it may, like Great r Britain, neglect its agriculture, allowing its lands to go out of cultivation and its population to grow up in towns, fall behind other nations in its methods of education and in the capacity of adapting to its uses the latest scientific knowledge, in order that it may squander its pecuniary and military resources in forcing bad markets and finding speculative fields of investment in distant corners of the earth, adding millions of square miles and of unassimilable population to the area of the Empire.\"

Chris Rowson
Local time: 13:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 243
Grading comment
Thank you for your very extensive answer!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fernando Muela
51 mins

agree  Maciej Andrzejczak: Maciej Andrzejczak
1 hr

agree  xxxEDLING
1 hr

agree  Refugio
1 hr

agree  Attila Piróth
1 hr

agree  Paula Ibbotson
1 hr

agree  xxxluisantos
2 hrs

agree  AnaBlyth
4 hrs

agree  A.Đapo
4 hrs

agree  Steffen Walter
6 hrs

agree  Fuad Yahya
6 hrs

agree  Christopher Crockett
9 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Basically imperial is nice to neutral: imperialistic is...


Explanation:
...always pejorative.

Both describe "one-man one-vote" governments where one man has the only vote.

At least in theory.

Both are otherwise the same thing. One nice example is King Leopold of Belgium who ruled over the Congo with taxpayer-funded Belgian soldiers & civil servants while owning it as a piece of personal property. He did bequest the place to the Kingdom upon his death, but then the place went independent...



Arthur Borges
China
Local time: 20:50
PRO pts in pair: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kardi Kho: yep, imperialistic is always pejorative
21 hrs
  -> Thinking of any country in particular?
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
IMPERIALES ZEITALTER aber IMPERIALISTISCHE WELTANSCHAUUNG etc etc


Explanation:
IMPERIAL denotes whatever pertains to an empire. IMPERIALISTIC denotes an attitude, a mindset, an ideology and the steps taken to concretize it in the real world. Make sure you distinguish between the two.

xxxIno66
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 28
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