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Central London vs Inner London

English translation: Central London descrines the central area, whilst Inner London is an administrative area

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12:14 Jan 30, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Central London vs Inner London
What is the difference betwen both terms?
xxxEDLING
English translation:Central London descrines the central area, whilst Inner London is an administrative area
Explanation:
"Today, Greater London consists of 33 boroughs: 12 inner-city or metropolitan boroughs (Inner London) and 20 outer boroughs (Outer London). Central London resembles an oval dish: it lies in the center of a basin crossed by the Thames and bordered by a low chain of hills to the north and south (the highest point is all of 474 ft/145 m)."

http://www.europeanvacationguide.com/travel/London_Overview....


http://www.lho.org.uk/meth/adm_bound.htm



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Note added at 2003-01-30 12:32:17 (GMT)
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Don\'t know what happened to my original answer (the first one to this question...), I seem to have managed to hide it without ever going near the \"hide\" button _ and I can\'t even see it to copy it either!

Anyway, what it said was that Central London is basically the most internal area - i.e. the smallest, whilst Inner London spreads out around it and Outer London constitutes the furthest reaches. Together they make up Greater London.

Ref. Native Londoner

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Note added at 2003-01-30 12:36:14 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Don\'t know what happened to my original answer (the first one to this question...), I seem to have managed to hide it without ever going near the \"hide\" button _ and I can\'t even see it to copy it either!

Anyway, what it said was that Central London is basically the most internal area - i.e. the smallest, whilst Inner London spreads out around it and Outer London constitutes the furthest reaches. Together they make up Greater London.

Ref. Native Londoner

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-30 12:37:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Wow, I\'ve now double-posted my comment - Don\'t know what\'s happening to this answer!!!
Selected response from:

Sarah Ponting
Italy
Local time: 18:24
Grading comment
Thanks all of you for your clarifying answers - I wish I could split the points, but Sarah's answer arrived in first.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3See explanation
Peter Coles
5 +1to build on sarah's answer...
Libero_Lang_Lab
4 +1Central London descrines the central area, whilst Inner London is an administrative area
Sarah Ponting
4 +1inner London is grittier!
Mary Worby


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
See explanation


Explanation:
"Central London" is a term that tends to be used to describe the commercial and entertainment centres in the centre of London, in particular those centred around the West End, i.e. in close proximity to Oxford St and Piccadily and has a fairly positive feel e.g. "the bright lights of the West End and Central London".

"Inner London" has a more political flavour and would tend to be used to describe a wider area and in particular local authority boroughs such as Wandsworth, Lambeth, Camden and Southwark. Although it has a legitmate neutral tone, it is also used to refer collectively to those boroughs who suffer social problems e.g. "the Inner London housing shortage" and therefore has a slightly negative undertone.

Peter Coles
Local time: 17:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 47

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Rowson: I used to live in Inner London (Wandsworth) and take a train to Central London (Covent Garden, Soho, Knightsbridge, etc.) for a more ... ummm... enlivening experience.
18 mins
  -> intriguing, but perhaps best not to go into too much detail on a public site :-)

agree  jerrie
22 mins

agree  Dolly Xu
59 mins
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
inner London is grittier!


Explanation:
Without more context, it is difficult to say, there are no hard and fast rules.

Central London is salubrious - a company might boast about its central London location. They are unlikely to boast about an inner London location. To me, this is the inner city ...

But that might just be my perception!

HTH

Mary

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 164

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Rowson: It sure is!
15 mins
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
to build on sarah's answer...


Explanation:
...which is basically correct:

Inner London as opposed to Greater London (not Outer London) relates to an administrative space, the boundary of Inner London is generally accepted as the M25 motorway. Outer London spills in to what were previously parts of the surrounding 'home counties'. Greater London embraces Inner London.
The boundaries coincided in the past with the remit of certain (now defunct) political organisations eg. The Inner London Eduucation Authority (which ran schools in Inner London!) and the Greater London Council (the local government body for Greater London, including Inner London)

Central London is not an official administrative space, just a section of the city which is in the centre and is therefore subject to various interpretations! It would normally be understood to include the WC and W1 and W2 postcodes, possibly also parts of EC London - though strictly these are part of the City of London!
Central London would be used to distinguish from North London, East London etc etc.


Hope that hasn't made it even more confusing!




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Note added at 2003-01-30 12:43:24 (GMT)
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Sarah is right - Inner London + Outer London = Greater London


    Lifelong Londoner (born within the sound of Bow Bells ;-))
Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:24
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 137

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  TonyTK: They say you can hear the Bells in Buck House on a good day.
8 mins

neutral  David Sirett: M25 "generally accepted" as Inner London boundary?! You're kidding! Greater London = the 32 London boroughs, Inner London = 12 of the London boroughs + the City.
16 mins
  -> i'll get my coat
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Central London descrines the central area, whilst Inner London is an administrative area


Explanation:
"Today, Greater London consists of 33 boroughs: 12 inner-city or metropolitan boroughs (Inner London) and 20 outer boroughs (Outer London). Central London resembles an oval dish: it lies in the center of a basin crossed by the Thames and bordered by a low chain of hills to the north and south (the highest point is all of 474 ft/145 m)."

http://www.europeanvacationguide.com/travel/London_Overview....


http://www.lho.org.uk/meth/adm_bound.htm



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-30 12:32:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Don\'t know what happened to my original answer (the first one to this question...), I seem to have managed to hide it without ever going near the \"hide\" button _ and I can\'t even see it to copy it either!

Anyway, what it said was that Central London is basically the most internal area - i.e. the smallest, whilst Inner London spreads out around it and Outer London constitutes the furthest reaches. Together they make up Greater London.

Ref. Native Londoner

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-30 12:36:14 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Don\'t know what happened to my original answer (the first one to this question...), I seem to have managed to hide it without ever going near the \"hide\" button _ and I can\'t even see it to copy it either!

Anyway, what it said was that Central London is basically the most internal area - i.e. the smallest, whilst Inner London spreads out around it and Outer London constitutes the furthest reaches. Together they make up Greater London.

Ref. Native Londoner

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-30 12:37:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Wow, I\'ve now double-posted my comment - Don\'t know what\'s happening to this answer!!!

Sarah Ponting
Italy
Local time: 18:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 67
Grading comment
Thanks all of you for your clarifying answers - I wish I could split the points, but Sarah's answer arrived in first.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Endre Both: To testify that I've seen your answer :-). Funny: if you just hide it, you should still be able to see it. There are mysterious things between heaven and earth...
16 mins
  -> thanks, it's definitiely a mystery!
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